Posts Tagged ‘lung cancer’

Can Depression Influence Lung Cancer Survival?

Wednesday, October 19th, 2016

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A new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology on October 3 concluded that worsening symptoms depression are associated with shorter survival for lung cancer patients, especially for those in the early stages of the disease. On the other hand, when symptoms lift, survival tends to improve. Researchers said “This study cannot prove causation–but it lends support to the idea that surveillance for depression symptoms and treatment for depression could provide significant impact on patients outcomes, perhaps even a mortality benefit.” They also said “Suprisingly, depression remission was associated with a mortality benefit as they had the same mortality as never-depressed patients.”

In the study more than 1700 newly diagnosed lung cancer patients between 2003 and 2005 who had completed an eight item depression assessment at diagnoses and 12 months later were followed. they found almost 40 percent or 681 people had depressive symptoms at diagnosis and 14 percent or 105 people developed new-onset symptoms during treatment. Those depressed at the beginning of the study were 17 percent more likely to die during follow up than those with out depressive symptoms. Those (105 patients) with newly-diagnosed depression symptoms were 50 percent more likely to die than those (640 patients) who never developed depression. And another 254 patients whose depression lasted throughout the study period were 42 percent more likely to die. However, those whose depression at diagnoses were free of depression one year later had the same risk of death as those without depression.

Researchers concluded “Clinicians have to do a better job of treating the whole person and not focusing on the disease only.” “From the patients’ perspective, hopefully some of them will take a look at this study and realize the feelings they arew experiencing are common and they will feel empowered to advocate for themselves and ask their clinician for help or resources when they need it.”

New Therapeutic Target for Lung Cancer.

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

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A new study published in Cell Reports found a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene that is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one that has been difficult to target. The KRAS gene (Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homology) produces proteins called K-RAS that influence when cells divide, and mutation in K-RAS may result in normal cells dividing uncontrollably and turning cancerous. Genetic mutations of KRAS occurs in about 30 percent of lung cancer and are associated with aggressive, therapy resistant disease with a poor prognosis. “There is a dearth of treatment options for tumors initiated by this gene.” Researchers found that activity resulting from the ACSL3 gene is essential for the KRAS lung cancer cells to survive, and suppressing ACSL3 causes these lung cancer cells to die.

In their research they found that the enzymatic activity of ACSL3 is needed for the mutant KRAS gene to promote the formation of lung cancer and in addition fatty acids, that are substances of ACSL3 enzyme, have a critical role. Several complementary approaches including cell lines, mice, and tumor samples from humans were used to understand the role of the biological significance of ACSL3 in lung cancer in this study.

New Program Improves Lung Cancer Detection

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015

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A new study on lung cancer detection presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference in Denver concluded that long-time smokers and past smokers now have a more accurate way to detect whether or not they have lung cancer using CT scan technology. The study compared CT scans and standard chest x-rays to detect lung cancer. CT scans obtain a multiple-image scan of the entire chest, whereas a standard chest x-ray produces a single image of the whole chest. Results showed that patients receiving CT scans had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of dying compared to those receiving standard chest x-rays.

The comparative study took place between September, 2014 and March, 2015 and gave CT scans to 375 patients of which 272 were eligible to continue in the program. Of this 272 patients, 19 had results that indicated malignant cancer.  Of those 19, 11 were confirmed malignant.  Eight of the 11 had lung cancer, and 3 had early stage lung cancer. Patients enrolled in the lung cancer detection program were considered high risk for lung cancer and all had a smoking history of at least 30 pack years that is the equivalent of smoking one pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years, and were current or former smokers without any signs or symptoms of lung cancer. The researchers said finding 3 early stage lung cancer patients  in the first 357 patients screened is incredible. Implementation of this program should save lives.

New Treatment that Effects Lung Cancer Cell Cycles But Does Not Effect Normal Cells.

Friday, May 29th, 2015

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A new lung cancer treatment reported in a recent issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine has been in development for 6 years and involves a molecule, RK-33, that interrupts  the cell cycle of lung cancer cells without harming normal cells and is effective by itself or in combination with radiation therapy. The researchers designed the RK-33 to bind to DDX3, an enzyme that helps in RNA unwinding and translating RNA into proteins. They also found that RK-33 is involved in DNA repair.  Normal cells have many such enzymes, but some cancer cells, including over 90 percent of lung cancer samples studied by the researchers, over expressed DDX3. Binding DDX3 with RK-33 reduces the amount of DDX3 available causing the cancer cells to die and making radiation therapy, that damages DNA, more effective. The researchers say “We can lower the dose of radiation significantly but actually get more bang for your buck” by pretreating lung cancer cells with RK-33. Further research is ongoing in multiple cancer types, including breast cancer, prostate, sarcoma and colorectal cancer.

Does Fitness Level Influence Risk of Cancer and Death in Men?

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

Does Fitness Level Influence Risk of Cancer and Death in Men

A new study published in the online JAMA Oncology concluded that men with a high fitness level in midlife seem to be at lower risk for lung and colorectal cancer, but not prostate cancer. In addition, a higher fitness level may also predict aa lower risk of death if they are diagnosed with cancer when they are older.

The purpose of the study was to look at the association between midlife cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and the incidence of cancer and survival at age 65 or older. The study included 13,949 men who had a baseline fitness exam where CRF was measured in a treadmill test between 1971 and 2009. Lung cancer, prostate and colorectal cancers were assessed on this group using medicare data between 1999 and 2009. during an average surveillance period of 6.5 years for the men, 1310 developed prostate cancer, 200 lung cancer, and 181 developed colorectal cancer.  Results showed that high CRF in midlife was associated with a 55 percent lower risk of lung cancer, and a 44 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to men with low CRF. However, this association was not seen between high CRF and lower prostate cancer risk. Researchers also found that high CRF in midlife was associated with a 32 percent lower risk of cancer death among men who developed lung, colorectal or prostate cancer at age 65 compared with men who had alow CRF.  In addition, high CRF in midlife was associated with a 68 percent reduction in cardiovascular disease death (CVD) compared with low CRF among men who developed cancer.  Further research is needed to determine specific levels of CRF necessary toi prevent site specific cancer.

Lung Cancer Now leading Cause of Cancer Deaths in Women in Developed Countries.

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

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A new study published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians concluded that lung cancer has surpassed breast cancer as the leading caused of cancer deaths in females in developed countries. They believe this change reflects the tobacco epidemic in women that occurred later than in men.  Lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer deaths for men in both developed and developing countries where breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in women (developing countries).  In 2012 it was estimated that there were  14.1 new cancer cases and 8.2 cancer deaths worldwide. In less developed countries, lung and breast cancer are the most frequent diagnosed cancers and the leading causes of cancer deaths in men and women respectively. In more developed countries, prostate and breast cancer are the more frequent diagnosed cancers among men and women, respectively, and lung cancer is the leading cause of death in both men and women.

Can a Protein Deficiency Lead to a Poor Prognosis in Breast and Lung Cancers?

Friday, February 6th, 2015

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A new study published in PloS One concluded that breast and lung cancer patients who have low levels of a protein called tristetraprolin (TTP) have more aggressive tumors and a poorer prognosis than those with high levels of the protein. Researchers said cancer arises through increased activity of oncogenes, protein that drives cancer growth, and the decreased activity of tumor supressors, protein that block malignant growth and progression. TTP is a cancer supressor protein and has been found to prevent lymphoma growth in mice. To study this further, the researchers here studied TTP by comparing patients who had high and low levels of TTP. They found a network of 50 different  genes associated with low levels of TTP in breast, lung and colon cancer tumors and also found this network present in patients with prostate, pancreatic and bladder cancers. This showed that TTP isinvolved in various mechanisms important for tumor growth and development and suggests that developing agents to target this network may provide an effective treatment accross a variety of tumors.

They also found that low levels of TTP were associated with a poor prognosis some cancers wuch as a higher rate of relapse in breast cancer patients, and a lower survival rate in lung adenocarcinoma patients. In addition, breast and cancer patients with low levels of TTP more often had more aggressive types of tumors.  Further research will focus on understanding how TTP fiunctions as a tumor suppressor in order to develop treatemtns specific for patients who have loiw levels of TTP.

 

Interviews with Cynthia Stamper Graff (holistic weight loss) Jessica Ortner (tapping and weight loss) and a brief Overview by Me (natural Rx for Lung Cancer) now Available for Listening.

Sunday, February 1st, 2015

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Best Selling Author Cynthia Stamper Graff is the President and CEO of Lindora, the nation’s largest medical-based program that has helped more than 750,000 people lose 15 million pounds and is the author of The new Lean for Life-her first book sold over 1 million copies. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.lindora.com

 

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My second guest, Jessica Ortner is co=producer of Tapping Solutions, a documentary on EFT/MeriodianTapping and weight loss and has lead over 3,000 women through her weight loss program. More information was presented earlier on this site or can be found at: http://www.facebook.com/followingjessicaortner

 

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With a Brief Overview of My Natural Lung Cancer Treatment 40 Years ago.

 

Enjoy the Interviews Below:

 

 

 

Interviews with Dr Veronique Desaulniers (breast cancer) and Dr Carl O Helvie (lung cancer) now Available.

Sunday, January 4th, 2015

DrVpictureDr Veronique has been in practice since 1979 and has written Heal Breast Cancer Naturally a best selling book on Amazon based upon her experience with breast cancer.  She discusses her 7 essential step coaching program to heal any chronic disease. More information is available earlier on this site or at:  http://www.BreastCancerConqueror.com

 

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Dr Carl O Helvie has been a nurse practitioner, author, researcher and educator for 60 years, has published 8 books and 4 additional book chapters including one best seller book You Can Beat Lung Cancer:Using Alternative/Integrative Interventions, hosts the Holistic Health Show on BBS Radio and is Founder and President of the Carl O Helvie Holistic Cancer Foundation. He has been listed in most nation references,  was awarded the Distinguished Career Award from the American Public Health Assn and is listed in Wikipedia. More information at: Http://www.HolisticHealthShow.com or http://www.BeatLungCancer.net

Enjoy the Interviews Below:

 

 

Is Smoking Associated with an Increased Risk of Developing a Second Smoking-Related Cancer?

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

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A new study published in the J of Clinical Oncology that analyzed five large prospective cohort studies reported that lung cancer (stage 1) bladder, kidney., and head and neck cancer survivors who smoked 20 or more cigarettes a day prior to their cancer diagnosis have an up to five-fold higher risk of developing a second smoking-related cancer when compared to survivors of the same cancer who never smoked. This association of smoking and 2nd cancer  was similar to smoking and primary cancers.

Researc hers said “As survival improves for a number of smoke-related cancers, patients are living longer, however,, smoking may increase the risk of developing a second smoking-related cancer among these survivors.” They continued on to say that health care professionals should emphasize the importance of smoking-cessation to all patients, including cancer survivors.

Data for these results included 5 prospective studies which included 2,552 patients with stage 1 lung, 6.386 with bladder, 3,179 with kidney, and 2,967 with head and neck cancer.  A total of 866 second primary smoking-related cancers were diagnosed among the survivors and the association between smoking status prior to primary cancer diagnosis and second smoke-associated cancer risk were assessed. In all four groups those who smoked   20 or more cigarettes daily prior to their first diagnoses were more likely to develop aa second smoking-related cancer when compared to the cohort who never smoked. These risks ranged from 3.3 times more like to 5.3 times more like likely depending upon the site of the cancer. In addition, those who were current smokers but smoked under 20 cigarettes a day or former smokers who quit before their first cancer diagnosis also had an elevated risk of developing a second primary cancer than those who never smoked.