Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Inflammation-Dr David Seaman and Cellular Expansion-Patti McNulty

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

DrDSeaman

My next show on Saturday at 12 noon PST will include the following guests.

Dr. David Seaman was the first person to author a scientific paper that specifically hypothesized that diets can be pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Since that paper was published in 2002, thousands of papers and numerous books have been published on the topic of diet and inflammation, which is now accepted as mainstream.

Dr. Seaman is a Professor of Clinical Sciences in the Chiropractic Medicine program at National University of Health Sciences in Pinellas Park, Fl. He has a BS from Rutgers University in 1982; a Doctor of Chiropractic from New York Chiropractic College in 1986; and a MS in Bio/nutrition from the University of Bridgeport in 1991

While in clinical practice in the late 1980’s, he became aware of the developing research that linked nutrition to the inflammatory process and noticed that appropriate dietary changes could significantly improve various musculoskeletal and visceral conditions. Based on this experience, he began to focus on nutritional approaches for inflammation/pain control and has followed the related scientific literature ever since. This led to the publication of the first book on nutrition for pain and inflammation, which was followed by many articles and book chapters devoted to this topic. His educational efforts resulted in being awarded the 2006 Academician of the Year by the American Chiropractic Association.

P McNulty

Patti McNulty began her education with four years of intensive training in a combined mental health/addictions and family counseling program. Subsequently, she spent twelve years providing both inpatient and outpatient addiction services to a range of psychiatric hospitals. She was then the primary Employee Assistance Program counselor for JFK and LaGuardia Airports in New York, where employees could receive counseling and addictions treatment on-site.

In 1996, she was awarded a New York State citation for her work with the survivors and employees involved in the Flight 800 plane crash that same year. Her work experience pulled her in the direction of not only further addictions treatment work, but also in trauma work in addicted populations.

In 2005, she became a holistic studies practitioner, completed two graduate programs at the School of Vanati in Pittsburgh, and is presently involved in the extension graduate program.

Patti started working at Serenity Acres Treatment Center in January of 2013, as a licensed Certified Associate Counselor for Alcohol and Drugs (CAC-AD), and provides addictions counseling, family education, and holistic therapy services to her clients. She also runs her own business, Healing Branches, in Severna Park, Md. At Healing Branches, Patti practices Cellular Expansion and Healing Energy Medicine—a form of hands on bodywork that heals through the cells for optimal health and wellness.

Enjoy the interview below:

 

 

Food/Antibiotics May Cause IBS

Wednesday, February 1st, 2017

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A recent review of research published in the American Journal of Physiology–Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, suggested that changes in the microorganisms in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract may be the cause of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This condition is common in up to 20 percent of the middle aged people in North America who suffer from abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea, or constipation or both. In the past it was thought to be caused by emotional stress, environmental factors, and genetics. Based upon their review of research they found: 1)diet can change the makeup of bacteria in the GI tract that may contribute to symptoms of IBS;  2) antibiotic use, which disturbs microbiota in the gut is associated with IBS; 3) changes in the gut microbiota  influences the ability of the GI tract to contract to move waste through the system; and 4) changes in the gut microbes can impair communication networks between the immune, nervous and endocrine systems, predisposing people to IBS.  They also found that emotional stress may change the shape and function of microrganisms in the GI tract. Authors were optimistic that their findings would help facilitate treatments for IBS.

Does Selenium Influence Cancer Risk?

Friday, September 9th, 2016

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A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that high blood selenium levels are associated with a decrease risk of developing liver cancer. Selenium in the natural form is found in fish, shellfish, meat, milk, eggs, and certain nuts such as Brazil nuts.

In the case-control study, the researchers investigated a cohort of 477,000 participants, and selected individuals who had developed liver cancer during a 10 year follow up. Blood samples were obtained and analyzed for selenium levels. They found that the third of the population with the lowest selenium level had a five to ten fold increase risk of developing liver cancer. They also found that selenium supplements do not have a direct protective effect against liver cancer. “However, it does conform the importance of a balanced diet, of which selenium forms an integral part.”

Can physical training and social support reduce fraility and malnutrition?

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

A new study reported in Science Digest concluded that a training program for the reactivation of older and frail people that included physical training and addressing nutritional-relevant aspects with the aid of non-professional volunteers at home has had positive effects on the physical condition and especially the social aspects of elderly frail people.

Previous studies showed that 11% of the over age 65 in Austria are frail, and 41% are pre-frail. Frailty was defined as reduced muscle mass and/or muscle power, malnutrition (undernourished or overeating), and chronic inflammation that is associated with health problems. .   In this study volunteers visited frail or malnourished people (average age 83 years) in their homes twice a week for a period of 12 weeks. The skilled volunteers trained together with the frail people (strength training with a Thera ribbon) and discussed nutrition related aspects. An active control group also received visits, but without nutrition or exercise training. After 12 weeks recorded results showed a significant improvement in the frail status and malnutrition frail group in which impaired nutrition was reduced by 25% and frailty was reduced by 17%. Interestingly, the control group who received social support only showed improvement with 23% less impaired nutrition and 16% less frailty. Researchers mad two major conclusions: that an active social life and social contacts are important for people to remain autonomous for as long as possible, and trained nonprofessional volunteers achieve similar good results with such a program as those conducted by professionals.

Tony Samara, Shaman, Interview Available.

Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

Tony Samara

Tony Samara, author of ‘Shaman’s Wisdom,’ ‘The Simplicity of Love Meditation,’ ‘Different Yet the Same,’ ‘Karma, Mantra and Beyond’ and ‘Discover Your Inner Buddha’ was born in England, grew up in Egypt, England, and also in Norway where he discovered the “Zen Buddhist philosophy”.

This discovery eventually led him to the Mount Baldy Zen Center in California, USA, where he learned the spiritual teachings of Kyozan Joshu Sasaki, Roshi. He had curiosity to explore further the essence of spirituality and thus went to live and learn with shamanic communities around the globe. By going on pilgrimage to various sacred sites in India, Tony was able to dwell deeply upon the ancient Vedic and Jain philosophies and work profoundly with the essence of these teachings.

Now people from all over the world visit Tony Samara to take spiritual guidance and experience being in his presence.

Tony Samara believes that “the vast majority of people go through life without directly experiencing the depths of their true self, or understanding their connection to life, or their relationship to others and to the world at large. We are often taught to only relate to the world through our senses. We think, we reason, we feel – but we do not know from our hearts what it means to be connected to what is beyond the senses.”

He recognizes that direct experiences have the potential to radically transform an individual and his or her life, as well as promote a profound and effortless letting go of past emotional, mental and physical pain and suffering.

His main countries of activity are in Europe, yet with the assistance of the Internet he is attracting a Global audience through frequent online interviews and live satsangs. His function is as a Spiritual Master who encourages all to lead their lives actively in a noble way in order to realize the evolution of human consciousness.

Verbal dialogue is not the essence of his teachings, but he explains in a direct and simple way that everyone can understand how each individual can practically integrate greater acceptance, peace and joy into their daily lives.

Tony Samara teaches with humour, humility and with infinite patience, empowering the individual with courage, trust and inner strength to continue on this journey back into wholeness, a path that leads towards real freedom.

“Conscious evolution is ultimate freedom. Overcoming the fear of what lies ahead, by illuminating the spiritual dimension within our nature, is awakening to the splendour of our hearts.

It is said that the mind clarifies matters and reveals truth, but, in fact, it creates confusion for the heart. True reality dwells in its natural center — the heart: the heart is the path to self-realization.

The totally natural state of joy and wisdom experienced as the heart opens to the truth, is the remarkable state of being, free for all to experience.”

Tony Samara is a mirror of what is possible, a shining reminder of the continuous possibility of being human. More information available at: http://www.TonySamara.com

Enjoy the Interview Below:

 

Can Vitamin C prevent Cataracts?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

logo1267406_mdA new study published in the journal Ophthalmology concluded that higher dietary intake of vitamin C has been found to potentially have a preventive effect on cataract progression in the first study of twins that looked at the influence of genetic and environmental factors on cataracts over time.

Three hundred twenty four pairs of female twins were followed over ten years by examining photographs of the subjects lenses that allowed researchers to analyze the level of opacity of the lens in detail. Their intake of vitamin C was also measured by means of a food questionnaire. Results showed that a higher intake of vitamin C was associated with a 33 per cent risk reduction of cataract progression and had “clearer” lenses after the 10 year s than those who consumed less vitamin C as part of their diet.   Researchers also found that environmental factors influenced cataracts more than genetic factors. Vitamin C is found in the fluid in the eye that bathes the lens and helps stop the lens from oxidizing and protects them from becoming cloudy. It is believed that the increased dietary vitamin C protects the eye by increasing the vitamin c in the fluid. Researchers said “The findings of this study could have significant impact, particularly for the ageing population globally by suggesting that simple dietary changes such as increased intake of fruit and vegetables as part of a healthier diet could help protect them from cataracts.”…”While we cannot avoid getting older, diabetes and smoking are also risk factors for this type of cataract, and so a healthy balanced diet and lifestyle generally should reduce the risk of needing a cataract operation.”Researchers also said “The human body cannot manufacture vitamin , so we depend on vitamins in the food we eat. We did not find a significant reduction risk in people who took vitamin tablets, so it seems that a healthy diet is better than supplements.” Researchers pointed out some of the limitations of the study.

Link for food glycemic index and lung cancer?

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

 

logo1267406_mdA new study in Cancer Epidemiology: Biomarkers and Prevention concluded that eating a diet with a high glycemic index was independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in a non-Hispanic white population. This was the largest study to investigate the potential link between glycemic index and lung cancer and also found the glycemic index was significantly associated with lung cancer risk in particular subgroups, such as never-smoked, those diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) subtype of lung cancer. Diet and lung cancer have been associated in the past and diets high in fruit and vegetables may decrease the risk whereas increased consumption of red meat, saturated fats and dairy products have shown increased lung cancer.

In the study 1,905 newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 2,413 healthy individuals were studied. Each self-reported past dietary habits and health histories and the flycemic index and glycemic load were determined using published glycemic index values, subjects. In addition,  were then divided into 5 equal groups based upon the glycemic index and glycemic load values.  Researchers found a 49 percent increased risk of lung cancer among subjects with the highest daily glycemic index compared to those with the lowest. In addition, the associations were greater among subjects who had never smoked, diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, or had less than 12 years of education.Researchers found that those who never smoked in the highest glycemic index group were more than twice as likely to develop lung cancer as those in the lowest group whereas among smokers the risk was only elevated by 31 percent between the high and low glycemic groups. Those in the high glycemic group were 92 percent more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma than those in the low group.  Among those with fewer years of education than 12 years subjects in the highest glycemic index group were 77 percent more likely to develop lung cancer than those in the low glycemic group compared to 13 percent in subjects with more than 12 years education. .Researchers thought this might relate to poor diet and smoking.

Likewise, glycemic index had no significant association with lung cancer suggesting “it is the average quality, instead of quantity, of carbohydrates consumed that may modulate lung cancer risks.” Researchers pointed out the limitations of the study and made suggestions for further research.

Can Individuals Control Inflammation in the Body and Reduce Chronic Illnesses?

Friday, August 14th, 2015

Logos 005In a new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition by a coalition of experts concluded that unresolved inflammation response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease and controlling it is crucial to human health. They also say nutrition can influence inflammatory processes and help reduce chronic disease risk. Researchers recognize inflammation is a normal process of host defense but that chronic inflammation can lead to a range of chronic illnesses. Thus, prevention or control of low-grade inflammation can be a target of healthy food or food ingredients. The research team looked at new approaches to deal with inflammation in the body and to help quantify how much diet can positively modulate inflammation.

Some of their conclusions follow: 1) individuals with  a deficiency or excess of certain micronutrients such as folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin E, Vitamin B1 and/or zinc  may lead to an ineffective or excessive inflammatory response, 2) high consumption of fat or glucose may cause post-prandial inflammation following meals and may lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and 3) the western style diet high in fat and simple sugars and often poor in specific micro nutrients has been linked to the increase prevalence of diseases that have a strong immunological and autoimmune component, including allergies, food allergies, atopic dermatitis, and obesity.

Does Yo Yo Dieting Increase your Risk of Cancer?

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

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The largest study to date reported in early the online American Journal of Epidemiology concluded that weight cycling, repeated cycles of intentional weight loss followed by regain, was not associated with overall risk of cancer in men and women after adjusting for body mass index and other factors. Previous studies in animals and humans have reported that weight cycling may lead to biological processes such as increased T-cell accumulation, enhanced inflammatory responses in adipose tissue, and lowered natural killer cell cytotoxicity that could lead to cancer. However, many of these studies have not been confirmed by follow up studies and at least 2 previous studies showed no association between weight cycling and cancer.

This study examined weight cycling and cancer among more than 132,999 men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutritional Cohort  of the American Cancer Society. Data collection began in 1992/1993 on men and women age 50 to 74 to explore the effect of nutrition on cancer incidence and mortality. Weight cycling and the incidence of all cancers and 15 individual cancers were studied. Over 25,000 subjects developed cancer during the 17 years of the study. Researchers said “This study, to our knowledge the largest and most comprehensive to date on the issue, should be reassuring. Our findings suggest that overweight and obese individuals shouldn’t let fears about ability to maintain weight loss keep them from trying to lose weight in the first place.”

Interviews with Dr Katie Rickel (weight loss) and Dr Laura Dabney (relationship problems) now Available.

Sunday, March 1st, 2015

Dr Katie Rickel

My first guest, Dr Katie Rickel, is a licensed clinical psychologist  who works at Structure House–a residential weight loss facility in North Carolina. She has presented at several conferences  and been featured on radio and television shows including Dr Oz. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.structurehouse.com

 

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My second guest, Dr Laura Dabney, is a physician who works with   professional men having relationship problems, has been interviewed on local and national radio and has an upcoming book on the unique difficultieas of professional men in long term relationships. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.drldabney.com

Enjoy the Interview below: