New Method for Killing Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells.

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A new study to be published in Clinical Cancer Research discusses a new way to kill breast cancer cells that are metastasizing  and these cells that spread to the brain, lungs, and bones are the leading cause of death for most cancer patients.  The research discovered how the cells moving to other areas of the body are killed by peptide CT20 that she discovered in 2012.  The peptide CT20 kills the cells by disrupting the folding mechanism inside cancer cells mediated by chaperonin and if the folding mechanism into 3D units is disrupted the cell dies.  Metastatic breast cancer cells have high levels of the chaperonin and the higher the levels the sicker the patient. Multiple strategies can be developed for fighting metastatic cancer cells because of the discovery of how the peptide inhibits the chaperonins folding ability and subsequently  kill cancer cells.  The amount of the peptide that kill cancer cells do not kill normal healthy, non-cancer cells so there will be less traumatic side effects compared to most chemo therapies. A nanoparticle was developed to transport the peptide specifically to metastatic cancer cells.

SEVA Therapeutics, a Massachusetts-based pre-clinical biotechnology company, has licensed the nanoparticle-peptide technology and plans future research to ultimately lead to new therapies. The combo now called SEVA-108, is expected to undergo a comprehensive safety evaluation by the end of this year and clinical trials in patients could start as early as the fourth quarter of 2017.

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