Cannabis Health Risk Lowered with Public Health Guidelines

A new study published in the American Journal of Public Health reported that Canada’s Lower Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines that were released with the endorsement of key public health and medical organizations provide ten science-based recommendations to enable cannabis users to reduce their health risk. Canada has one of the highest cannabis use rates in the world and related problems range from memory and physical coordination problems, to motor vehicle accidents and mental health or dependence problems.

Researchers noted that as Canada moves toward legalization with the federal Cannabis Act it was a good time to educate and inform cannabis users on order to reduce or prevent cannabis-related health issues. They said “Factual, science-based information can provide guidance to cannabis users to make choices that reduce both immediate and long-term risks top their health.” They continue “Cannabis use carries with it real health risks, and mitigating those risks for Canadians–particularly young Canadians–must be the first priority.” “The CMA (Canadian Medical Association) continues to recommend a broad policy approach focused in preventing problematic drug use, ensuring the availability of assessment and treatment services for those who wish to stop using, and harm reduction to increase the safety for those who are using.”

Guidelines include abstaining, and the elevated potential of  risk related to initiating use at an young age, using high potency products, alternative delivery system, heavy use and driving, and identifying people at higher risks of problems with concrete recommendations for risk reduction in each case.

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