Archive for the ‘exercise’ Category

Dr Terry Wahl Overcome Debilitating Effects of Multiple Sclerosis

Sunday, March 11th, 2018

 

 Dr. Terry Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa where she conducts clinical trials. She is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, which confined her to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. Dr. Wahls restored her health using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain and now pedals her bike to work each day. She is the author of The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine, The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles (paperback), and the cookbook The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life: The Revolutionary Modern Paleo Plan to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions            

You can learn more about her work from her website, www.terrywahls.com. She conducts clinical trials that test the effect of nutrition and lifestyle interventions to treat MS and other progressive health problems. She also teaches the public and medical community about the healing power of the Paleo diet and therapeutic lifestyle changes that restore health and vitality to our citizens. She hosts a Wahls Protocol Seminar every August where anyone can learn how to implement the Protocol with ease and success. Follow her on Facebook (Terry Wahls MD) and on Twitter at @TerryWahls.    Learn more about her MS clinical trials by reaching out to her team MSDietStudy@healthcare.uiowa.edu.

Clinical trials in which her team is participating

The links to our Nations MS Society funded research

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/About-the-Society/News/National-MS-Society-and-University-of-Iowa-Launch

Two studies in Bastyr University that are asking patients with MS or Parkinson’s disease about whether they are following the Wahls diet.

These studies are based upon surveys that are completed every 6 months and do not require visits to the study site. Multiple sclerosis

http://bastyr.edu/research/studies/complementary-alternative-medicine-care-multiple-sclerosis-cam-care-ms

Parkinson’s study
http://bastyr.edu/research/studies/complementary-alternative-medicine-care-parkinsons-disease-cam-care-pd

Enjoy the Interview Below:

 

 

 

 

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Multiple Myeloma Survivor Treated by Dr Stanislaw Burzynski

Sunday, January 28th, 2018

My guest, David Emerson says “I was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in February of 1994 at the age of 34. I underwent induction therapy of 5 rounds of VAD, 2 rounds of cytoxan and an autologus bone marrow transplant, all in 1995. I relapsed in 10/96, underwent local palliative local radiation, relapsed again in 9/97 and was told “nothing more can be done for you. ”

”I underwent a “quack” cancer therapy called antineoplaston therapy (ANP) from 11/97-4/99. I reached complete remission where I have remained since.  I have remained in complete remission from my multiple myeloma by living an evidence-based, non-toxic, anti-myeloma lifestyle through nutrition, supplementation, bone health, mind-body, detox. and more. I consider my anti-myeloma regimen to be a metronomic, low-dose, maintenance myeloma therapy. But non-toxic.

I am also a multiple myeloma cancer coach. Click my website to join a free webinar about the Multiple Myeloma Cancer Coaching Program that I researched and developed based on my 22 plus years living with multiple myeloma I would not be alive today if it weren’t for the Internet and The Burzynski Research Institute. I created the Galen Foundation as a 501(c)(3) non-profit and launched www.PeopleBeatingCancer.org with the mission to empower cancer survivors and caregivers through information, education and support.

Enjoy the interview below:

 

Exercise—Any Physical Activity Saves Lives

Wednesday, October 18th, 2017

Physical activity of any kind can raise the heart rate, prevent heart disease and death and help people meet the current guidelines of 30 minutes  a day or 150 minutes a week according to a new study published in the Lancet. The study involved more than 130,000 people in 17 countries. People from low and middle income countries who often do not participate in leisure time physical activities were included. Researchers said “By including low and middle income countries in this study, we were able to determine the benefits of activities such as active commuting,. having an active job, or even doing housework. ” He also said one in four people worldwide do not meet the current activity guidelines and that number is nearly three in four in Canada.

Using the new criteria of activity influenced the death rates of all diseases and and heart disease 28% and 20%. They also found that those who had brisk walking 750 minutes a week reduced their risk of death by 36%They also found that less than 3% of the people achieved that level with leisure activities but 38% did with activities such as commuting, being active at work, and doing housework. They concluded that if people could be active for at least 150 minutes a week, a total of 8% of deaths could be prevented..

One alcohol drink daily raises breast cancer risk!

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

One alcohol drink a day (small glass wine or beer-10 gms alcohol) increases pre-menopausal breast cancer risk by 5 percent and post-menopausal breast cancer risk by 9 percent according to new research reported by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund. Researchers also found that vigorous exercise such as running or fast bicycling decreases the risk of both pre and post-menopausal breast cancer ,They also confirmed earlier findings that moderate exercises decrease the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer that is the most comm,on type of breast cancer. Researchers said “With this comprehensive and up to date report  the evidence is clear, Having as physically active lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight throughout life and limiting alcohol–these are all steps women can take to lower their risk.”

This report analyzed 119 studies, including data on 12 million women and 260,000 cases of breast cancer. The study found the equivalent of 10 gm of alcohol a day increased the risk and the standard drink is 14 gm of alcohol. specifics of exercise and cancer risk found follow: pre-menopausal women who were the most active had a 17 percent lower risk and post-menopausal women had a 10 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to those who were the least active. Moderate activity such as walking and gardening gave a 13 percent lower risk when compared to the most vs least active women for developing cancer.

Other findings included: being overweight or obese increases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer; women who breast fed were are lower risk of breast cancer; and the great adult weight gain  the greater the post-menopausal breast cancer risk.  There was limited evidence for the following findings that must be repeated, 1) non-starchy vegetables lower the risk for estrogen-receptor (ER) negative breast cancer that is a less common but a more challenging type to treat. ) 2) dairy, diets high in calcium and foods containing carotenoids seemed to lower risk of breast cancer. Carrots, apricots, spinach and kale are all foods high in carotenoids and should be studied for their health value;

Exercise Not Important in Weight Loss

Friday, February 10th, 2017

 

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Exercise may not be key to controlling weight  according to new research in Peer J.  Young adults from the United States and four other countries were studied by researchers who found that neight physical activity nor sedentary lifestyle were associated with weight gain. Researchers said that although exercis has many health benefits people who are physically active tend to be healthier but although this activity burns calories it also increases appetite, and people may compensate by eating more, or by being less active the rest of the day.

In the study participants in the 5 countries wore tracking devices called accelerometers on their waists for a week to measure their energy expenditure and step count. Researchers also measure their weight, height, and body fat. After the initial exam participants returned one and two years later. Initially only 44 percent of American men and 20 percent of American women met the U.S. Surgeon General physical activity guidelines that recommended at least two and a half hours of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise such as brisk walking weekly.

Results showed total weight gain was greater among those who met the physical activity guidelines. In America, men who met the guidelines gained a half pound per year, whereas American men who did not meet the guidelines lost 0.6 pounds. Researchers also found no relationship between sedentary lifestyle initially and subsequent weight gain or weight loss. The only significant factors for weight gain were weight at the initial visit, age and gender.

Can physical training and social support reduce fraility and malnutrition?

Wednesday, August 24th, 2016

A new study reported in Science Digest concluded that a training program for the reactivation of older and frail people that included physical training and addressing nutritional-relevant aspects with the aid of non-professional volunteers at home has had positive effects on the physical condition and especially the social aspects of elderly frail people.

Previous studies showed that 11% of the over age 65 in Austria are frail, and 41% are pre-frail. Frailty was defined as reduced muscle mass and/or muscle power, malnutrition (undernourished or overeating), and chronic inflammation that is associated with health problems. .   In this study volunteers visited frail or malnourished people (average age 83 years) in their homes twice a week for a period of 12 weeks. The skilled volunteers trained together with the frail people (strength training with a Thera ribbon) and discussed nutrition related aspects. An active control group also received visits, but without nutrition or exercise training. After 12 weeks recorded results showed a significant improvement in the frail status and malnutrition frail group in which impaired nutrition was reduced by 25% and frailty was reduced by 17%. Interestingly, the control group who received social support only showed improvement with 23% less impaired nutrition and 16% less frailty. Researchers mad two major conclusions: that an active social life and social contacts are important for people to remain autonomous for as long as possible, and trained nonprofessional volunteers achieve similar good results with such a program as those conducted by professionals.

Will Exercise Improve Muscle Repair in Older Adults?

Wednesday, June 22nd, 2016

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New research published in The FASEB Journal concluded that regular exercise is important for muscles to repair themselves more quickly after injury. Although muscle repair slows as we age this study shows that contrary to previous beliefs that muscles did not completely repair with age that after only eight weeks of exercise, old mice experienced faster muscle repair and regained more muscle mass than those of the same age that had not exercised. Researchers said “Exercise per-conditioning may improve the muscle repair response in older adults to stimulate such an acute period of atrophy/inactivity and or damage.”

Researchers used three groups of mice: old mice that were exercise trained; old mice that were not exercises trained; and young mice that were not exercise trained. in the first group, old mice were trained three days/week for eight weeks and the effect of exercise in aging muscles was measured by comparing the three groups.  Changes in muscle repair with aging w2as measured by injecting snake venon that is commonly used to induce muscle injury in rodents, into the old and young non-exercise mice.  All three groups were compared prior to muscle injury, ten days after injury, and 28 days after injury, Researchers said “This is a clear demonstration that the physiological and metabolic benefits of exercise radiate to skeletal muscle satellite cells, the adult stem cells responsible for repair after injury, even in senescent animals.”

Exercise for Chemo Induced Neuropathy.

Wednesday, June 8th, 2016

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A new study reported at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting reported that some simple and inexpensive exercises can reduce neuropathy in hands and feet due to chemotherapy. In the study of over 300 cancer patients researchers compared the neuropathic symptoms (shooting or burning pain, tingling, numbness, and sensitivity to cold) in patients who took part in a specialized six-week walking routine with gentle, resistant band training at home to those who did not exercise. Results showed that the exercisers reported significantly fewer symptoms of neuropathy and the benefits seemed to be most beneficial to older patients. The exercise program used was developed by Karen Mustian at the University of Rochester and is known as the Exercise for Cancer Patients (EXCAP) which as been copyrighted and evaluated. In one recent study it was shown to reduce chronic inflammation and congnative impairment amon people receiving chemotherapy.

One researcher said “Twelve years ago when we started this work a lot of people saqid it was not safe for most cancer patients to exercise. Now we know it can be safe when done correctly, and that it has measurable benefits. But more exercis ins’t always better for patients who are going through chemo-so it’s important to continue our work  and find a way to personalize exercise iun a way that will help each individual.”  More research is planned.

Does Excessive Sitting Decrease Health Condition of Heart Disease Patients Who Exercise?

Friday, December 4th, 2015

logo1267406_mdNew research published in the European Journal of Cardiovascular Prevention concluded that patients with heart disease who sit a lot have worse health even if they exercise.

In the study 278  patients with coronary artery disease were studies for their sedentary lifestyle and its effect on health. All had been through a cardiac rehab program that taught them how to improve their level of exercise in the long term.  All participants wore an activity monitor during their waking hours for 9 days to measure their amount of being sedentary (mainly sitting) or active (doing light housework, moderate or vigorous levels of activity) compared to health markers. Some health markers included body mass index (BMI), and cardio respiratory fitness

Researchers found that subjects with coronary artery disease spent an average of eight hours daily being sedentary. Researchers were surprised at this result and said “This was surprisingon how to exercise more given that they had taken classes.” ” We assumed they would be less sedentary but they spent the majority of the day sitting.”  Results showed that men spent an average of 1 hour more sitting than women because women tended to do more light intensity activities such as light h0usework, running errands and walking to the end of the driveway. They found that subjects who sat more had a higher BMI and lower cardio respiratory fitness assessed using VO2 peak (aerobic capacity or the maximum rate at which the heart, lungs and muscles use oxygen during an exercise test). Results found were independent of age, gender, or physical activity level.

Researchers suggested the following activities to move more: 1) Get up and move every 30 minute; 2)Stand up during TV commercials or do light exercises while watching TVl and 3) Set a timer and take regular breaks from sitting 4) Take lunch break outside instead of in front of the computer, 5) Go to bed instead of sitting in front of the TV and get the benefit of sleep, and 6) Monitor activity levels to determine when you are most sedentary.

Can Improved Fitness Counteract Brain Atrophy in the Elderly?

Friday, November 27th, 2015

Logos 005A new study published in the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society concluded  that improving fitness may counteract brain atrophy in older adults. The researchers said “Many people think it is too late to intervene with exercise once a person shows symptoms of memory loss, but our data suggests that exercise may have a benefit in this early stage of cognitive decline.”

Researchers studied data on previously inactive subjects between the ages of 61 and 88 years of age, who were put on an exercise regime that included moderate intensity walking on a treadmill four times a week over a twelve week period. They found the cardio respiratory fitness improved by 8 percent as a result of training in both healthy subjects and those with mild-cogitative impairment. They also found the moderately intense exercise program increased the thickness of the brain’s cortex, outer layer of the brain that atrophies with Alzheimer’s disease. Results showed that both healthy older adults and those who had been diagnosed with mild cogitative impairment-an early stage of Alzheimer-benefited from the program.