Archive for the ‘lung cancer’ Category

Page Ad in X-Zone for You Can Beat Lung Cancer

Saturday, February 3rd, 2018

 

X-Zone Page ad for You Can Beat Lung Cancer: Using an alternative/integrative approach. . See Page 16.

 

http://www.xchroniclesnewspaper.com/

New Therapeutic Target for Lung Cancer.

Wednesday, August 3rd, 2016

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A new study published in Cell Reports found a new way to target lung cancer through the KRAS gene that is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancer and one that has been difficult to target. The KRAS gene (Kirsten Rat Sarcoma Viral Oncogene Homology) produces proteins called K-RAS that influence when cells divide, and mutation in K-RAS may result in normal cells dividing uncontrollably and turning cancerous. Genetic mutations of KRAS occurs in about 30 percent of lung cancer and are associated with aggressive, therapy resistant disease with a poor prognosis. “There is a dearth of treatment options for tumors initiated by this gene.” Researchers found that activity resulting from the ACSL3 gene is essential for the KRAS lung cancer cells to survive, and suppressing ACSL3 causes these lung cancer cells to die.

In their research they found that the enzymatic activity of ACSL3 is needed for the mutant KRAS gene to promote the formation of lung cancer and in addition fatty acids, that are substances of ACSL3 enzyme, have a critical role. Several complementary approaches including cell lines, mice, and tumor samples from humans were used to understand the role of the biological significance of ACSL3 in lung cancer in this study.

Link for food glycemic index and lung cancer?

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

 

logo1267406_mdA new study in Cancer Epidemiology: Biomarkers and Prevention concluded that eating a diet with a high glycemic index was independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in a non-Hispanic white population. This was the largest study to investigate the potential link between glycemic index and lung cancer and also found the glycemic index was significantly associated with lung cancer risk in particular subgroups, such as never-smoked, those diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) subtype of lung cancer. Diet and lung cancer have been associated in the past and diets high in fruit and vegetables may decrease the risk whereas increased consumption of red meat, saturated fats and dairy products have shown increased lung cancer.

In the study 1,905 newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 2,413 healthy individuals were studied. Each self-reported past dietary habits and health histories and the flycemic index and glycemic load were determined using published glycemic index values, subjects. In addition,  were then divided into 5 equal groups based upon the glycemic index and glycemic load values.  Researchers found a 49 percent increased risk of lung cancer among subjects with the highest daily glycemic index compared to those with the lowest. In addition, the associations were greater among subjects who had never smoked, diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, or had less than 12 years of education.Researchers found that those who never smoked in the highest glycemic index group were more than twice as likely to develop lung cancer as those in the lowest group whereas among smokers the risk was only elevated by 31 percent between the high and low glycemic groups. Those in the high glycemic group were 92 percent more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma than those in the low group.  Among those with fewer years of education than 12 years subjects in the highest glycemic index group were 77 percent more likely to develop lung cancer than those in the low glycemic group compared to 13 percent in subjects with more than 12 years education. .Researchers thought this might relate to poor diet and smoking.

Likewise, glycemic index had no significant association with lung cancer suggesting “it is the average quality, instead of quantity, of carbohydrates consumed that may modulate lung cancer risks.” Researchers pointed out the limitations of the study and made suggestions for further research.

New Program Improves Lung Cancer Detection

Wednesday, July 22nd, 2015

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A new study on lung cancer detection presented at the American Thoracic Society International Conference in Denver concluded that long-time smokers and past smokers now have a more accurate way to detect whether or not they have lung cancer using CT scan technology. The study compared CT scans and standard chest x-rays to detect lung cancer. CT scans obtain a multiple-image scan of the entire chest, whereas a standard chest x-ray produces a single image of the whole chest. Results showed that patients receiving CT scans had a 15 to 20 percent lower risk of dying compared to those receiving standard chest x-rays.

The comparative study took place between September, 2014 and March, 2015 and gave CT scans to 375 patients of which 272 were eligible to continue in the program. Of this 272 patients, 19 had results that indicated malignant cancer.  Of those 19, 11 were confirmed malignant.  Eight of the 11 had lung cancer, and 3 had early stage lung cancer. Patients enrolled in the lung cancer detection program were considered high risk for lung cancer and all had a smoking history of at least 30 pack years that is the equivalent of smoking one pack of cigarettes a day for 30 years, and were current or former smokers without any signs or symptoms of lung cancer. The researchers said finding 3 early stage lung cancer patients  in the first 357 patients screened is incredible. Implementation of this program should save lives.

New Treatment that Effects Lung Cancer Cell Cycles But Does Not Effect Normal Cells.

Friday, May 29th, 2015

Lung Cancer Cell Cycles

A new lung cancer treatment reported in a recent issue of EMBO Molecular Medicine has been in development for 6 years and involves a molecule, RK-33, that interrupts  the cell cycle of lung cancer cells without harming normal cells and is effective by itself or in combination with radiation therapy. The researchers designed the RK-33 to bind to DDX3, an enzyme that helps in RNA unwinding and translating RNA into proteins. They also found that RK-33 is involved in DNA repair.  Normal cells have many such enzymes, but some cancer cells, including over 90 percent of lung cancer samples studied by the researchers, over expressed DDX3. Binding DDX3 with RK-33 reduces the amount of DDX3 available causing the cancer cells to die and making radiation therapy, that damages DNA, more effective. The researchers say “We can lower the dose of radiation significantly but actually get more bang for your buck” by pretreating lung cancer cells with RK-33. Further research is ongoing in multiple cancer types, including breast cancer, prostate, sarcoma and colorectal cancer.

Does Fitness Level Influence Risk of Cancer and Death in Men?

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

Does Fitness Level Influence Risk of Cancer and Death in Men

A new study published in the online JAMA Oncology concluded that men with a high fitness level in midlife seem to be at lower risk for lung and colorectal cancer, but not prostate cancer. In addition, a higher fitness level may also predict aa lower risk of death if they are diagnosed with cancer when they are older.

The purpose of the study was to look at the association between midlife cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and the incidence of cancer and survival at age 65 or older. The study included 13,949 men who had a baseline fitness exam where CRF was measured in a treadmill test between 1971 and 2009. Lung cancer, prostate and colorectal cancers were assessed on this group using medicare data between 1999 and 2009. during an average surveillance period of 6.5 years for the men, 1310 developed prostate cancer, 200 lung cancer, and 181 developed colorectal cancer.  Results showed that high CRF in midlife was associated with a 55 percent lower risk of lung cancer, and a 44 percent lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to men with low CRF. However, this association was not seen between high CRF and lower prostate cancer risk. Researchers also found that high CRF in midlife was associated with a 32 percent lower risk of cancer death among men who developed lung, colorectal or prostate cancer at age 65 compared with men who had alow CRF.  In addition, high CRF in midlife was associated with a 68 percent reduction in cardiovascular disease death (CVD) compared with low CRF among men who developed cancer.  Further research is needed to determine specific levels of CRF necessary toi prevent site specific cancer.

Lung Cancer Now leading Cause of Cancer Deaths in Women in Developed Countries.

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

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A new study published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians concluded that lung cancer has surpassed breast cancer as the leading caused of cancer deaths in females in developed countries. They believe this change reflects the tobacco epidemic in women that occurred later than in men.  Lung cancer has been the leading cause of cancer deaths for men in both developed and developing countries where breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer deaths in women (developing countries).  In 2012 it was estimated that there were  14.1 new cancer cases and 8.2 cancer deaths worldwide. In less developed countries, lung and breast cancer are the most frequent diagnosed cancers and the leading causes of cancer deaths in men and women respectively. In more developed countries, prostate and breast cancer are the more frequent diagnosed cancers among men and women, respectively, and lung cancer is the leading cause of death in both men and women.

Interviews with Dr Veronique Desaulniers (breast cancer) and Dr Carl O Helvie (lung cancer) now Available.

Sunday, January 4th, 2015

DrVpictureDr Veronique has been in practice since 1979 and has written Heal Breast Cancer Naturally a best selling book on Amazon based upon her experience with breast cancer.  She discusses her 7 essential step coaching program to heal any chronic disease. More information is available earlier on this site or at:  http://www.BreastCancerConqueror.com

 

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Dr Carl O Helvie has been a nurse practitioner, author, researcher and educator for 60 years, has published 8 books and 4 additional book chapters including one best seller book You Can Beat Lung Cancer:Using Alternative/Integrative Interventions, hosts the Holistic Health Show on BBS Radio and is Founder and President of the Carl O Helvie Holistic Cancer Foundation. He has been listed in most nation references,  was awarded the Distinguished Career Award from the American Public Health Assn and is listed in Wikipedia. More information at: Http://www.HolisticHealthShow.com or http://www.BeatLungCancer.net

Enjoy the Interviews Below:

 

 

Can Chili Peppers Slow the Growth of Lung Cancer Cells?

Wednesday, November 12th, 2014

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Researchers presenting at the American Institute for Cancer Research Annual Research Conference concluded that capsaicin, the compound that gives chili peppers their heat, drive the death of lung cancer cells and slows tumor growth in mice. Researchers said “Our studies have found that by giving the mice capsaicin in their food every day we are able to suppress lung tumours in mice models.” They further said “We knew other lab studies had found capsaicin has anti-cancer activity but there was nothing on small cell lung cancer. ”  Finding that capsaicin degrades at a slower pace in lungs compare4d to other organs the researcher said “This is good news because that means that there is more intact capsaicin in the lung, which is available to stop the growth of tumours.”

Researchers used mice with impaired immune systems and induced tumor growth with human small cell lung cancer cells. Half of the mice were given capsaicin daily for 6 weeks and this group showed decreased tumor growth when compared to the mice eating standard food without the capsaicin. Further research showed capsaicin caused the cancer cells to self-destruct without affecting the normal cells. The amount of capsaicin the mice consumed was relatively mild. More research is ongoing.

 

 

Can Lung Cancer Remain Hidden for 20 Years?

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

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A new study published in Science concluded that lung cancer can be dormant for over 20 years before becoming abn aggressive for of cancer. Studying 7 patients who were smokers, never smokers, and ex-smokers they found that after the first genetic mistake that caused the cancer it could exist undetected for many years until new additional faults trigger rapid growth of the disease. Their goal is to improve detection and reduce the devastating effect of lung cancer. The researcher says ” Survival from lung cancer remains devastatingly low with many new targeted treatments making a linited impact 8on the disease. By understanding how it develops we’re opening up the diseases evolutionary ruolwe book in the hope that we can start to predict its next steps.”  New information about smoking and lung cancer was also uncovered and many of the early genetic faults are caused by smoking. However, as the disease progresses these become less important with the majority of faults caused by a new process generating mutations within the tumor controlled by a protein called APOBEC. The researcher said “This fascinating research highlights the need to find better ways to detect lung cancer earlier when it’s still following just one evolutionary path,  If we can nip the disease in the bud and treat it before it has started traveling down different evolutionary routes we could make a real difference in helping more people survive the disease.” More research is planned.