Archive for the ‘obesity’ Category

Alzheimers-Here today. Gone tomorrow. Good News.

Sunday, November 19th, 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr. Dale Bredesen is internationally recognized as an expert in the mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. He graduated from Caltech, then earned his MD from Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC. He served as Chief Resident in Neurology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) before joining Nobel laureate Stanley Prusiner’s laboratory at UCSF as an NIH Postdoctoral Fellow. He held faculty positions at UCSF, UCLA and the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Bredesen directed the Program on Aging at the Burnham Institute before coming to the Buck Institute in 1998 as its founding President and CEO.  Dr Bredesen has mentored many, many physicians and PhD learners in his lab, presented over 300 papers, written over 200 peer reviewed papers written numerous book chapters and abstracts,, written several books including his recent the End of Alzheimer’s: The first program to prevent and reverse cognitive decline, received numerous patents and honors. In addition, recently he has been interviewed on many television  and radio shows including Dr Oz. You can see his curriculum vitae at: https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/1a2e49_f0a51bffa9a341dca2ab7af9b6fd0c3d.pdf

The uniform failure of recent drug trials in Alzheimer’s disease has highlighted the critical need for a more accurate understanding of the fundamental nature of Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Bredesen’s research has led to new insight that explains the erosion of memory seen in Alzheimer’s disease, and has opened the door to a new therapeutic approach. He has found evidence that Alzheimer’s disease stems from an imbalance in nerve cell signaling: in the normal brain, specific signals foster nerve connections and memory making, while balancing signals support memory breaking, allowing irrelevant information to be forgotten. But in Alzheimer’s disease, the balance of these opposing signals is disturbed, nerve connections are suppressed, and memories are lost. This model is contrary to popular dogma that Alzheimer’s is a disease of toxicity, caused by the accumulation of sticky plaques in the brain. Bredesen believes the amyloid beta peptide, the source of the plaques, has a normal function in the brain — promoting signals that allow some of the nerve connections to lapse. Thus the increase in the peptide that occurs in Alzheimer’s disease shifts the memory-making vs. memory-breaking balance in favor of memory loss. This work has led to the identification of several new therapeutic candidates that are currently in pre-clinical trials.

Dr. Bredesen’s novel insights into the fundamental nature of Alzheimer’s disease recently attracted an investment of $3.5 million toward a $10 million goal for initial clinical trials of these new therapeutics. This generous support came from the private venture capitalist Douglas Rosenberg, who is helping to fund the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Network, centered at the Buck Institute. The unit is screening drug candidates to find those that can preserve a healthy balance in the signaling pathways that support memory. Dr. Bredesen’s work on nerve cell signaling is also the focus of a collaboration between the Buck Institute and BioMarin Pharmaceuticals, Inc., which is seeking treatments for a rare form of Alzheimer’s disease, early onset Familial Alzheimer’s Disease (eFAD), which may develop in people as young as 30 years of age.

Listen to the Interview below:

 

 

Inflammation-Dr David Seaman and Cellular Expansion-Patti McNulty

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

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My next show on Saturday at 12 noon PST will include the following guests.

Dr. David Seaman was the first person to author a scientific paper that specifically hypothesized that diets can be pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Since that paper was published in 2002, thousands of papers and numerous books have been published on the topic of diet and inflammation, which is now accepted as mainstream.

Dr. Seaman is a Professor of Clinical Sciences in the Chiropractic Medicine program at National University of Health Sciences in Pinellas Park, Fl. He has a BS from Rutgers University in 1982; a Doctor of Chiropractic from New York Chiropractic College in 1986; and a MS in Bio/nutrition from the University of Bridgeport in 1991

While in clinical practice in the late 1980’s, he became aware of the developing research that linked nutrition to the inflammatory process and noticed that appropriate dietary changes could significantly improve various musculoskeletal and visceral conditions. Based on this experience, he began to focus on nutritional approaches for inflammation/pain control and has followed the related scientific literature ever since. This led to the publication of the first book on nutrition for pain and inflammation, which was followed by many articles and book chapters devoted to this topic. His educational efforts resulted in being awarded the 2006 Academician of the Year by the American Chiropractic Association.

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Patti McNulty began her education with four years of intensive training in a combined mental health/addictions and family counseling program. Subsequently, she spent twelve years providing both inpatient and outpatient addiction services to a range of psychiatric hospitals. She was then the primary Employee Assistance Program counselor for JFK and LaGuardia Airports in New York, where employees could receive counseling and addictions treatment on-site.

In 1996, she was awarded a New York State citation for her work with the survivors and employees involved in the Flight 800 plane crash that same year. Her work experience pulled her in the direction of not only further addictions treatment work, but also in trauma work in addicted populations.

In 2005, she became a holistic studies practitioner, completed two graduate programs at the School of Vanati in Pittsburgh, and is presently involved in the extension graduate program.

Patti started working at Serenity Acres Treatment Center in January of 2013, as a licensed Certified Associate Counselor for Alcohol and Drugs (CAC-AD), and provides addictions counseling, family education, and holistic therapy services to her clients. She also runs her own business, Healing Branches, in Severna Park, Md. At Healing Branches, Patti practices Cellular Expansion and Healing Energy Medicine—a form of hands on bodywork that heals through the cells for optimal health and wellness.

Enjoy the interview below:

 

 

Dr Gil Kajiki, Natural Rx for Thyroid/AutoImmune Conditions.

Sunday, June 19th, 2016

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My guests next Saturday, Dr Gil Kajiki is the founder of the Valley Thyroid Institute. He graduated from the Pasadena College of Chiropractic and has been a chiropractor for 30 years. The main focus of his practice is thyroid and Auto Immune conditions.

Through working with his patients he developed the Kajiki Protocol for determining thyroid and autoimmune issues with a particular concentration on Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. He offers his patients answers and protocols to improve thyroid function and overall health.

With his roots in chiropractic-biophysics, Dr. Kajiki was busy helping patients in the San Fernando Valley in Southern California with their spinal structural corrective care when his wife became ill with what at first appeared to be Epstein Barr.

As he watched his wife’s health deteriorate under the care of several doctors, Dr. Kajiki began a relentless search for answers to why his healthy wife could become so ill and yet no one seemed to know how to care for her. After more than two years of tests, medication, B12 shots, and finally hospitalization, it was her husband and not her medical provider who came to her rescue.

After countless hours of study, consultation with colleagues, and testing, Dr. Kajiki diagnosed his wife with Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, an autoimmune condition that attacks the thyroid. He spent the next several months treating her autoimmune condition through natural supplements, lifestyle modifications, and dietary changes. She is now symptom free and doesn’t take any thyroid medication.

Dr. Kajiki couldn’t stand to think that perhaps somebody else was having to go through the prolonged struggle with this condition as he and his wife had. Because of this experience, he dedicated his practice to helping Hashimoto’s and low thyroid patients overcome their symptoms naturally.

Dr. Kajiki still works from his office in Tarzana, California, however his patients are from countries and cities all across the globe—many as far away as Canada, Romania, London and New Zealand. He is available to his patients in person, via skype or phone. Dr. Kajiki also has more than 100 video testimonials of successful outcomes from happy patients that implemented his Low Thyroid Protocol and are thrilled to tell the world of their success.

Dr. Kajiki has been interviewed several times on Lisa Garr’s “The Aware Show”, heard on KPFK. Garr (also a Hashimoto’s patient), collaborated with Dr. Kajiki on an educational 5 DVD series of self-help for patients with chronic thyroid problems called “The Thyroid Mystery Solved”. More information is available at: http://www.valleythyroidinstitute.com/

Are There More Deaths from Lack of Exercise or from Obesity?

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

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A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that twice as many deaths may be attributed to the lack of physical activity compared with the number of deaths attributed to obesity and a brisk 20 minute walk daily could reduce an individual’s risk of early death. . Physical inactivity has  consistently been associated with a great risk of heart disease, cancer and early death.,

In the sample of over 334,000 European men and women followed over twelve years researchers measured height, weight, and waist circumference, and used self-assessment to measure levels of physical activity. Findings showed that the greatest reduction in risk of premature death occurred in the comparison between inactive and moderately inactive groups based upon combining activities at work with recreational activities. Just under a quarter  (22.7%)of subjects were inactive based upon reporting of no recreational activity combined with a sedentary occupation. Researchers estimated that doing exercise equivalent to a 20 minute brisk walk daily would move an individual from the inactive to moderately inactive group and reduce their risk of premature death by between 16 and 30 percent. This was greatest among normal weight subjects but even those with a higher BMI saw benefits.

Using the most recent available death rates in Europe they estimated 337,000 of the 9.2 million deaths among Europeans were attributed to obesity (classed as a BMI greater than 30) but double this number of deaths (676,000) could be attributed to physical inactivity. Researchers said the message is that just a small amount of physical activity daily could have substantial health benefits.