Archive for the ‘optimism’ Category

Dr Michael Greger/Plant Based Diet and Marc Mallat/Dimensional Awareness Process

Sunday, July 14th, 2019

A founding member and Fellow of the American College of Lifestyle Medicine, Michael Greger, MD, is a physician, New York Times bestselling author, and internationally recognized speaker on nutrition, food safety, and public health issues. He has lectured at the Conference on World Affairs, testified before Congress, and was invited as an expert witness in the defense of Oprah Winfrey in the infamous “meat defamation” trial. In 2017, Dr. Greger was honored with the ACLM Lifestyle Medicine Trailblazer Award. He is a graduate of Cornell University School of Agriculture and Tufts University School of Medicine. His latest book How Not to Die became an instant New York Times Best Seller. He has videos on more than 2,000 health topics freely available at NutritionFacts.org, with new videos and articles uploaded every day. All proceeds he receives from his books, DVDs, and speaking engagements is all donated to charity. More information is available at: https://drgreger.org/  

Marc Mallat is a transpersonal psychotherapist, corporate trainer, and creator of the groundbreaking therapeutic healing process – the Dimensional Awareness Process. He has over 30 years of experience in personal development training, acquiring “hands-on” knowledge and practical expertise in several different types of psychotherapies, healing and behavioral change methods. He has dedicated himself to intense “inner work” and continuous, never-ending improvement. Mallat is the CEO of Progressions Group—a company specialized in classical corporate trainings, life coaching, personal development, transpersonal psychotherapy, and energetic healing modalities. More information available at: www.progressionsgroup.com

Enjoy the (Interviews Below:

 

Bailey O’Brien, a 10 year stage 4 melanoma survivor, was current guest

Sunday, February 24th, 2019

Bailey O’Brien is a stage 4 melanoma survivor, cancer coach and community lover. In 2007 at the age of 17 she was first diagnosed cancer before she became terminal in 2011. Finding herself at the end of her conventional-wisdom-rope, Bailey took a chance on alternative methods including treatment at a Mexican hospital and a radical diet and lifestyle change. Despite the odds and by the grace of God, she was healed! Bailey’s healing prompted her quest for meaning, truth and purpose, and since finding it her life has been forever changed for the good. She now helps others with cancer and it brings her great joy to share her belief that in every situation there is always hope, health-related and otherwise. Bailey is living proof that with God, all things are possible! Her website is www.baileyobrien.com and you can find her on Facebook and Instagram at facebook.com/baileyobrien330 and Instagram.com/bailey330.

Enjoy the Interview below:

 

Dr Linda Isaacs Continues the Cancer Treatments She Used with Dr Nicholas Gonzalez.

Sunday, August 26th, 2018

Dr Linda Isaacs

Linda L. Isaacs, M.D., received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Kentucky, graduating with High Distinction with a major in biochemistry. She was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. She subsequently received her medical degree from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine in 1985. She completed a residency in Internal Medicine at the Department of Veteran’s Affairs Medical Center at New York University Medical School. She is certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, most recently completing recertification in 2011.

Dr. Isaacs worked with her colleague Nicholas J. Gonzalez, M.D., for more than twenty years, using a nutritional approach for treating patients diagnosed with cancer and other serious degenerative illnesses. After his untimely death in July 2015, she has continued with the work they shared. The treatment involves diet, which varies from patient to patient and can range from almost exclusively vegetarian to one that is heavy in animal protein and fat; individualized nutritional supplement protocols, which include large doses of pancreatic enzymes; and procedures such as coffee enemas that help the body rid itself of metabolic wastes.

In 1999, Dr. Isaacs and Dr. Gonzalez completed a research study in patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer: the results were published in the peer-reviewed journal Nutrition and Cancer, showing survival well beyond what is described in the medical literature. They also published a series of case reports in the peer-reviewed journal Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine, and co-authored the book The Trophoblast and the Origins of Cancer. Dr. Isaacs wrote the article “Deciding to Pursue an Alternative Cancer Therapy” to help prospective patients sort through their options; it is available on her website at https://www.drlindai.com/pursuing_alt_ther.html.

Visit her website at DrLindaI.com to learn more about her treatment and review the application process to become a patient.

Enjoy the interview below:

 

Do Optimistic People Have Healthier Hearts and Other Health Indicators?

Wednesday, January 21st, 2015

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A new study published in Health Behavior and Policy Review concluded that the most optimistic people in a study of 5,000 subjects had twice the odds of being in ideal cardiovascular health than their pessimistic counterparts and was significant even after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics and poor mental health. Indicators used to assess cardiovascular health included blood pressure, body mass index, fasting plasma glucose and serum cholesterol levels, dietary intake, physical activity and tobacco use. These are the same indexes used by the American Heart Association to define heart health. . For each item a score of 0, 1 or 2 points was allocated with   each subject representing poor, intermediate and ideal scores. The scores for the seven indexes were totaled for a score of 0 to 14 where the highest total score indicated better health.

Subjects ranging from 45 to 84 years of age with a racial diversity of 38 percent white, 28 percent African-American,. 22 percent Hispanic/Latino, and 12 percent Chinese also completed surveys that assessed their mental health, level of optimism, and physical health based upon self report medical diagnoses of arthritis, liver and kidney disease. Subjects were followed for 11 years and data was collected every 18 months to 2 years.  Scores on optimism of individuals increase with their total health scores and those who were most optimistic were 50 to 76 percent more likely to have total health scores in the intermediate and ideal range respectively. In addition, when sociodemographi8c characteristics such as age, race, ethnicity, income, and education status were factored in the association between optimism and cardiovascular health were more pronounced, Those who were most optimistic were twice as likely to have ideal cardiovascular health, and 55 percent more likely to have a total health score in the intermediate range. In addition, those who were the most optimistic had better blood sugar and total cholesterol levels, were more physically active, had healthier body mass indexes, and were less likely to smoke.