Posts Tagged ‘association’

Can Chemical Exposure Affect Your Vitamin D Level?

Friday, September 23rd, 2016

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Recent research published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism concluded that exposure to bisphenol A (BPA) and other endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC’s) may reduce levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream. EDC’s are chemicals that interfere with hormones in the body and can have adverse health effects.

The review included over 1,300 studies that found links between chemical exposure and health problems including infertility, obesity, diabetes, neurological problems and hormone-related cancers. In the study 4.667 adults previously in a national survey between 2005 and 2010 in which participants provided blood samples so their vitamin D level could be measured, and urine samples to evaluate EDC exposure or specifically substances left behind after the body metabolized BPA and phthalates. Results showed that people exposed to larger amounts of phthalates were more likely to have low levels of vitamin D in the bloodstream that subjects who were exposed to smaller amounts of EDC’s and this was stronger in women., The researchers also found an association between exposure to higher levels of BPA and reduced vitamin D levels in women but the relationship was not statistically significant in men. Researchers acknowledged that more research was needed. EDC’s are found in everyday products and throughout the environment and vitamin D levels have been implicated in outcomes of numerous conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer.

Is there an Association between High Cholesterol and Breast Cancer?

Friday, July 18th, 2014

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In a study presented recently at the Frontiers in Cardiovascular Science meeting in Spain researchers concluded that there ia an association between high blood cholesterol and breast cancer based upon results of  a study over a 14 year period in the United Kingdom.  This retrospective study included more than 1 million people across the UK from 2000 to 2014. From a sample of 664,159 women 22,938 had hyperlipidaemia and 9,312 had breast cancer. About 530 with hyperlipidaemia developed breast cancer.  Using a statistical model to study the association between hyperlipidaemia and breast cancer they found that having hyperlipidaemia increased the risk of breast cancer by 1.64 times. The researcher said “We found that women with high cholesterol had a significantly greater chance of developing breast cancer . This was an observational study so we can’t conclude that high cholesterol causes breast cancer but the strength of this association warrants further investigation.”