Posts Tagged ‘brain fog’

Dr Terry Wahl Overcome Debilitating Effects of Multiple Sclerosis

Sunday, March 11th, 2018

 

 Dr. Terry Wahls is a clinical professor of medicine at the University of Iowa where she conducts clinical trials. She is also a patient with secondary progressive multiple sclerosis, which confined her to a tilt-recline wheelchair for four years. Dr. Wahls restored her health using a diet and lifestyle program she designed specifically for her brain and now pedals her bike to work each day. She is the author of The Wahls Protocol: How I Beat Progressive MS Using Paleo Principles and Functional Medicine, The Wahls Protocol: A Radical New Way to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions Using Paleo Principles (paperback), and the cookbook The Wahls Protocol Cooking for Life: The Revolutionary Modern Paleo Plan to Treat All Chronic Autoimmune Conditions            

You can learn more about her work from her website, www.terrywahls.com. She conducts clinical trials that test the effect of nutrition and lifestyle interventions to treat MS and other progressive health problems. She also teaches the public and medical community about the healing power of the Paleo diet and therapeutic lifestyle changes that restore health and vitality to our citizens. She hosts a Wahls Protocol Seminar every August where anyone can learn how to implement the Protocol with ease and success. Follow her on Facebook (Terry Wahls MD) and on Twitter at @TerryWahls.    Learn more about her MS clinical trials by reaching out to her team MSDietStudy@healthcare.uiowa.edu.

Clinical trials in which her team is participating

The links to our Nations MS Society funded research

http://www.nationalmssociety.org/About-the-Society/News/National-MS-Society-and-University-of-Iowa-Launch

Two studies in Bastyr University that are asking patients with MS or Parkinson’s disease about whether they are following the Wahls diet.

These studies are based upon surveys that are completed every 6 months and do not require visits to the study site. Multiple sclerosis

http://bastyr.edu/research/studies/complementary-alternative-medicine-care-multiple-sclerosis-cam-care-ms

Parkinson’s study
http://bastyr.edu/research/studies/complementary-alternative-medicine-care-parkinsons-disease-cam-care-pd

Enjoy the Interview Below:

 

 

 

 

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Chemo-Brain is part of Cancer Progression and Chemotherapy

Friday, December 1st, 2017

Chemo brain or chemo fog are the memory and thinking problems experienced by cancer survivors are not just the result of chemotherapy but may start as the tumor forms and develops  before chemo was used according to a new study published in the journal Neuroscience.  Researchers found that female mice with a form of breast cancer demonstrat4ed impaired performance on learning and memory tests before chemotherapy drugs were used., They said “Our work isolated that the cancer is responsible for some of the memory and thinking complaints experienced by cancer survivors, and that drug therapy adds to the problem.” “Both factors independently effect brain function in different ways, which can lead to the development of other psychological disturbances, such as anxiety and depression.” Researchers said as many as 65on. taking longer to complete tasks, and difficulty multitasking.

Progression of tumor and later chemotherapy lead researchers to the identification of three different brain changes. 1)The combination of tumor growth and chemotherapy led to shrinkage of . While the tumor is developing, the body’s immune system releases cytokines  to inhibit the cancer development. Researchers found this reaction caused in the brains nervous system impairing its function. 2) Chemotherapy limited the production of new brain cells in the regions responsible for memory function which lead to a loss of memory. 3)  The combination of tumor growth and chemotherapy lead to shrinkage in brain regions that are important for learning and memory.

the study involved female mice, half with cancer and the other half without. Learning and memory tests were administered initially to determine the the impact of the tumor on the brain. After this mice were either given chemo or a saline solution (control). .Tests were again administered plus some additional ones. After testing was completed researchers brain images, tissue, and blood samples were used to analyze changes in brain structure and cytokinase activity mentioned earlier Before treatment mice with tumors performed less well on memory and learning tests than mice without tumors. After chemotherapy the performance of cancerous mice worsened, and the non-cancerous mice also showed sign’s of deterioration     Further research is planned..