Posts Tagged ‘cognitive ability’

Green Tea may Improve Memory Impairment, and Reduce Brain Insulin Resistance, and Obesity.

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

Green tea components may alleviate high-fat and high-fructose (HFFD)-induced insulin resistance and cognitive impairment.according to a new study published in The FASEB Journal. Previous studies identified the potential of EGCG (epigallocatechin-3-gallate) to treat a variety of human diseases but none recognized the impact on insulin resistance According to researchers “Green tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world after water, and is grown in at least 30 countries.” “The ancient habit of drinking green tea may be a more acceptable alternative to medicine when it comes to combating obesity, insulin resistance, and memory impairment.”

Three month old male mice  C57BL/6J were divided into 3 groups based upon diet:1) a control group fed with a standard diet: 2) a group fed with a  high fat and high fructose diet (HFFD) and 3) a group fed with an HFFD and 2 grams of EGCG per liter of drinking water.  Mice were monitored for 16 weeks and researchers found that those fed with HFFD had a higher final body weight than the HFFD+EGCG micIn performing a Morris water maze test, the mice in the HFFTD took longer to find the platform than the mice in the control group. The HFFD+EGCG group had a significantly lower  escape latency and escape distance than the HFFD group on each test day. When the hiden platform was removed to perform a probe trial, HFFD treated mice spent less time in the target quadrant compared to the control group, with fewer platfrorm crossings. The HFFD+EGCG group exhibited a significant increase in the average time spent in the target quadrant and had greater numbers of platform crossings, showing that EGCG could improve HFFD-induced memory impairment. .

Does the Presence of a Smart Phone Reduce Brain Smarts.

Friday, June 30th, 2017

A new study discussed on CBS news  concluded that participants in the study with smart phones in another room significantly outperformed those with  their smartphones on their desk so that your cognitive capacity is significantly reduced when your smartphone is within reach–even if it is off. Studies were conducted with about 800 smartphone users in an attempt to measure how well people can complete tasks when they have their smartphones nearby even though turned off.

In one study participants were asked to sit at the computer and take a series of tests that required full concentration to score well. The tests measured the available cognitive ability of participants. Before beginning participants were randomly instructed on their desk with the face down, in their pocket or personal bag, or in another room. All were instructed to turn the phones to silence. Researchers found that those with their smartphone in another room significantly outperformed those with it on the desk, and slightly outperformed those with it in a pocket or bag.

In another study researchers looked at how a person’s self reported smartphone dependence or the strength of their reported need for a smartphone to get through a typical day– affected cognitive capacity.  Subjects performed the same series of computer-based tests as the first group and were randomly assigned to either keep their smart phones either in sight on the desk face up, in a pocket or bag, or in another room. In this study, some subjects were also asked to turn off the smartphones. Researchers found that subjects who were the most dependent on their smartphones performed worse compared with their less-dependent peers, but only when their smartphones were on the desk or in their pocket or bag. Researchers also found that it did not matter whether smartphones were turned off or on, or whether it was face down or faced up. But having a smartphone within sight or easy reach reduced a persons ability to focus and perform tasks because part of their brain was active working to not pick up the phone.