Posts Tagged ‘research’

Athletes are at risk for skin cancer.

Wednesday, September 4th, 2019

At a recent conference of the Physiological Society’s Extreme Environmental Psychology a researcher said athletes ranging from hikers, to tenn is to runnersexceed the recommended ultraviolet exposure limit by up to eight-fold during the summer and fall seasons. Even though exercise is assocoated with a reduced risk of cancer, skin cancer is the exception. For malignant skin cancers, those in the 90th percentile of exercise have an increased risk of cancer than those in the 10th percentile. And outdoor activities have consistently demonstrated an elevated risk for skin cancer in research studies.

Ultraviolet radiation is categorized byy wavelengths as UV- (320-400 nm) that is about 95% of radiation reaching the earth; UV-B (290-320 nm) whichis about 5% of the radiation reaching earth; and UV-C (200-290 nm). In the skin, the skins blood circulation can be reached by UV-A, whereas most of the UV-B is absorbed by the outer layer of the skin due to its short wavelength.

Responses to untraviolet rays are also affected by skin pigmentation. The bodys ability to create two important substances  are affected by ultraviolet radiation. These are vitamin D and folate whih are especially important in pregnancy and early childhood development and UV radiation helps vitamin D synthesis and causes folate to break away. Some believe early human populations living in Africa, evolved skin pigmentation to protect themselves from folate degradation and as later populations moved away from the equator skin depigmentation allowed for higher levels of vitamin D synthesis. The researcher concluded with “Sun protection in athletes is especially important as multiple studies demonstrate an elevated risk of skin cancer for those who regularly participate in outdoor sports or exercise. Suprisingly, fewer than 25% of surveyed athletes reported regular use of sunscreen,m so there is clearly more awarenewss-raising that needs to be done.”

Colon cancer and colitis worsen as a result of frying oil consumption in mouse studies.

Wednesday, August 28th, 2019

In a new study published in Cancer Prevention Research researchers concluded that feeding frying oil to mice exaggerated colonic inflammation, enhanced tumor growth and worsened gut leakage, spreading bacteria or toxic bacterial products into the blood stream. Researchers said their research does not say that frying oil can cause cancer but that it suggests fried foods may exacerbate and advance conditions of the colon. “If somebody has IBD or colon cancer and they eat this kind of food, there is a chance it will make the diseases more aggressive.”

In their study researchers used a real-world sample of canola oil, in which falafel had been cooked at 325 degrees farenheit in a standard commercial fryer at a restaurant in Massachusetts. The oil had been analyzed for an array of chemical reactions during the frying process and characterized according to a fatty acid profile, the level of free fatty acids and the status of oxidation.  A combination of the frying oil and fresh oil was added to the powdered diet of one group of mice and the control was fed the powder with only fresh oil mixed in. Rersearches said “We tried to mimic the human being’s diet.” They found that adding the frying oil to the diet worsened colonic inflammation, colon tumor growth, and gut leakage. For example, tumor growth doubled in size from the control to study groups.

To determine if oxidation of polmunsaturated fatty acids, which occur when the oil is heated, is instrumental in the inflammattory effects, polar compounds from the frying oil was isolated and fed to the mice.  Results were similar to those from the experiment in which mice were fed frying oil. This suggested that the polswar compounds mediated the inflammatory effects. Researchers cautioned tyhat more research is needed but suggested people with inflammatory bowel disease eat less friend foods.

New study finds optimistic people sleep better and longer.

Wednesday, August 14th, 2019

A new study published in the journal Behavioral Medicine concluded that young and middle aged adults who are most optimistic tend to be better sleepers. Over 3,500 subjects age 32 to 51 from 4 major cities in the USA were included in the sample. In the study optimism was measured using a 10-item survey which asked them to rate on a 5 point scale how much they agreed with positive statements such as “I’m always optimistic about my future” and included negatively worded sentences such as “I hardly expect things to go my way.” Scores on the survey questionaire ranged from six (least optimistic) to 30 (most optimistic). Subjects completed the survey two times  five years apart. Questions included overall sleep quality and duration during the past month, symptoms of insomnia, difficulty falling asleep,and the number of hours of actual sleep they obtained. A subset of the study  wore activity monitors for three consecutive nights including two week nights and one weekend night. The monitors were worn two time one year apart.

Researchers reported “Results from the study revealed a significant associations between optimism and various characteristics of self reported sleep  after adjusting for a wide range of variables, including socio-demographic characteristics, health conditions and depressive symptoms.”  They found that with each standard deviation increase regarding optimism scores there was a 78% higher odds of reporting very good sleep quality. In addition, those who had greater levels of optimism were more likely to report they got adequate sleep usually six to nine hours nightly and were also 74% more likely to report no symptoms of insomnia and to report less daytime sleepiness. A 2016 study found that about 1/3 of adults in the USA fail to get adequate sleep increasing their risk of chronic illnesses. Researchers stated “The lack of healthy sleep is a public health concern, as poor sleep quality is associated with multiple problems, including higher risks of obesity, hypertension and all cause mortality.” “Dispositional optimism–the belief that positive things will occur in the future-has emerged as a psychological asset of particular salience for disease-free survival and superior health.” These findings bolster previous findings of the researchers in which they found optimists ages 45 to 84 were twice as likely to have ideal heart health than those will least optimism.

Breast Cancer May be Spread in an Unhealthy Gut.

Friday, July 26th, 2019

 

A new study at the University of Virginia reported in medicalxpress.com concluded that an unhealthy gut promotes the spread of breast cancer more quickly to other parts of the body by making the cancer cells more aggressive and invasive. Researchers found that disrupting the microbiome of mice caused hormone receptor-positive breast cancer cells to become more aggressive and spread. Researchers said that predicting whether hormone receptive-positive breast cancers will metastasize or not is affected by a variety of factors. “One of them is having a high level of immune cells called macrophages present within the tissue.” She continued “There have also been studies that have demonstrated that increased amounts of structural protein collagen in the tissue and tumor also lead to increased breast cancer metastasis.” Researchers concluded that having an unhealthy microbiome before breast cancer increases both and their effect is powerful and sustained.
Although the researchers used antibiotics to disturb the mice’s natural gut bacteria they emphasis antibiotics are not dangerous and should not be avoided by women, if needed, and more research is needed to establish if there is a link between chronic antibiotic use and cancer outcome. It is hope that as a result of this research doctors can manipulate the microbiome to benefit patients with breast cancer. Some things that may be useful include “A healthy diet, high in fiber, along with exercise, sleep—all of those things that contribute to positive overall health.”

Glioblastoma Research Shows Tumor Cell Death in Cell and Animal Studies Using Antihistamines.

Wednesday, July 17th, 2019

A new study published in EMBO Molecular Medicine Journal concluded that “antihistamines and other drugs that increase the permeability of the lysomal membrane can be considered as an enhancing therapy for patiets with glioblastoma alongside established treatments.” In the research they found that “glioblastoma cells depend upon the expression of a gene which produces the MDGI protein (small fatty acid binding protein). Inhibiting of this gene results in the death of the tumor cells.” The absence of MDGI causes instability in the membranes of lysosomes, cleaning organelles found inside tumor cells, and in turn, resulting in the leakage of acidic and proteolytic enzymes contained in the lysosomes into the cytoplasm, initiating cell death. Reasearchers said their research “demonstrates that MDGI  is a key factor regulating and maintaining the structure of the lysosomal membrane. This is the first gene found to regulate the stability of the membrane.”  Their results are especially interesting because they found that cell death caused by leakage in the lysosomes of glioblastoma can be activated by using drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier” and in this study they used the antihistamine clemastine.

In cell cultures the antihistamine in lysosome-initiated cell death in glioblastoma cells were at concentrations that has no significant effect on healthy cells of different types.  In mouse models it was effective in reducing the spread of brain tumors and improving the survival rates of the animals. In the most invasive brain tumor model, the antihistamine resulted in the disappearance of the entire tumor.

 

 

 

How Much Coffee is too Much?

Wednesday, July 10th, 2019

 

A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that drinking 6 or more cups of coffee daily may be detrimental to your lealth by increasing your risk of heart disease by up to 22%. This is the first study to study the upper limits of coffee caffeine and heart disease. In the study 347,077 participants from the United Kindom Biobank, aged 37 to 73 were evaluated in terms of the risk of cardiovascular disease in line with coffee consumption and genetic variations by focusing on the ability of the caffeine-metabolizing gene (CYP1A2) to better process caffeine. Researchers concluded that despite carriers of the fast processing gene variation being 4 times quicker at metabolizing caffeine, the research did not support the belief that these people could safely consume more caffeine, more frequently withlout detrimental health effects.   Thus, moderation in coffee consumption is need for heart health.

Some Breast Cancer Patients Benefit from Tart Cherry That Reduced Joint Pain, and Sore Muscles

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

A new study reported in Science Daily concluded that tart cherry decreases joint pain and sore muscles in some breast cancer patients by reducing the musculoskeletal effects of aramatrase inhibitors. These inhibitors are a standard treatment for hormone receptive-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women and help prevent recurrence by inhibiyting the action of amomatasew that is an enzymew that converts androgens to estrogens. Almopst half of women who use this treatment have joint and muscle pain that can be debilitating and may cause patients to stop treatment.

In the random, double-bind study women were plaqced in a group that received 1 ounce of tart cherry concentrate in 8 ounces of water dailyfor 6 weeks with a group who received a placebo. All had stage 1,2,3 non-metastatic breast cancer.  The study continued through May 2016 to August 2018 and 60 patients were enrolled.  Patients documented their pain intensity at the start of the study, weekly and at the end of the study. Patients who completed the study reported a 34.7% mean decrease in pain compared to 1.4% in the placebo group.  Recearchers say the flavonoids and anthocyanins in the tart cherry have an anti-inflammatory properties that may play a role in reducing the side effects observed. There was a statistical significant difference in the pain levels experienced by patients in the group that received the tart cherry.

Radiation Increases Cardiac Problems for Lung Cancer Patients

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019

A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Carediology concluded that thoracic radiotherapy for lung cancer patients led to more than 10% of patients having heart attacks, heart failure, and other cardiac problems. Rates for those considered at high risk for cardiac problems were even higher for those with no history of cardiovascular disease.

In the study researchers evaluated data for 748 patients with non-small cell lung cancer and found a direct correlation between increaqsed dosages of heart radiation exposure and the riusk of cardiac problems. Researchers concluded that patients should receive lower dosages of radiation than national guidelines recomment and should be 10 gray units compared to 20. In addition, researchers recommended finding ways to mitigate the harmful effects of radiation.

Irregular Sleep Patterns associated with several Metabolic Disorders

Wednesday, June 19th, 2019

A new study in Diabetic Care reported that not following a regular bedtime and wake up schedule and getting different amounts of sleep each night can put people at higher risks for obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension, high blood sugar, and other metabolic disorders. In fact, they found that for every hour of variation in bed time and time asleep, a person can have up to a 27% greater chance of experiencing a metabolic abnormality. Past studies have shown a link between insufficient sleep and metabilic disorders but had not evaluated the factor of irregular sleep and disorders. This research showed that even after considering the amount of sleep a person gets and other lifestyle factors, everyt one hour night to night difference in bed time or the duration of a nights sleep multiplies the adverse metabolic effect.

In this study researchers followed 2003 men and women, ages 45 to 84, participating in the NHLBl-funded Multi-Ethnic Srtudy of Atherosclerosis. Subjects were followed for a median of 6 years to evaluate the relatiopnship between sleep regularity and metabolivc effects. Subjects wore actigraph wrist ewatches to closely tract sleep schedules and to provide objectivity for seven consecutive days.  They also kept a sleep  diary and responded to standard questionaires about sleep habits and other lifestyle and health factors. The actigraphic tracking took place between 2010 and 2013 and subjects were followed to 2016-2017. Results showed the variations in sleep duration and bedtimes preceded the development of metaboliv disorders and provides some evidence supporting a causal link between iurregular sleep and metabolic disfunction.  Other findings include that participants whose sleep varied more than one hour were more likely to be African-American, work non-day shift schedules, smoked, and had shorter sleep duration.  This group also had higher rates of depression symptoms, total caloric intake, and index of sleep apnea.  Researchers said that increasing sleep duration or bedtime variation was strongly associated with multiple metabolic and simultaneous problems such as lower HDL cholesterol. and higher waist circumference, blood pressure,  total triglycerides, and fasting glucose. In summary, maintaining as regular sleep schedule has beneficial metabolic effects.

New Early Blood Test for Lung Cancer detection.

Wednesday, June 5th, 2019

Holistic-Health-Show-with-Dr-Carl-O-Helvie

The Arizona Daily Star reported a study on a new blood test to identify to detect and quantify early cancer cells carried out at the University of Arizona. Researchers combined the latest in epigenetics that reports genes that turn on and off with informatics that includes advanced data-processing and analytics. Researchers said they could successfully detect early stage lung cancer that iws commercialized in a new company, DesertDx LLC.

The test is based on a process called methylation by which cancer disrupts the DNA makeup. It recognizes biological markers for methylation to detect and quantify the presence of cancer cells.  These markers allow doctors to evaluate the effectiveness of surgery by comparing the markers before and after surgery.  It also allows clinicians to assess for recurrence of cancer.  One authority said it is best used in conjunction with computerized tomography, of CT scans.  He continues on to say “You might see a nodule in a CT scan image, but up until now we haven’t had an easy way to know if what we see is cancerous or benign. The only way is a tissue biopsy.”  “This blood test allows us to characterize what we’re able to see in a scan and say whether it’s cancer or not, all using a routine blood draw.”