Posts Tagged ‘research’

Glioblastoma Research Shows Tumor Cell Death in Cell and Animal Studies Using Antihistamines.

Wednesday, July 17th, 2019

A new study published in EMBO Molecular Medicine Journal concluded that “antihistamines and other drugs that increase the permeability of the lysomal membrane can be considered as an enhancing therapy for patiets with glioblastoma alongside established treatments.” In the research they found that “glioblastoma cells depend upon the expression of a gene which produces the MDGI protein (small fatty acid binding protein). Inhibiting of this gene results in the death of the tumor cells.” The absence of MDGI causes instability in the membranes of lysosomes, cleaning organelles found inside tumor cells, and in turn, resulting in the leakage of acidic and proteolytic enzymes contained in the lysosomes into the cytoplasm, initiating cell death. Reasearchers said their research “demonstrates that MDGI  is a key factor regulating and maintaining the structure of the lysosomal membrane. This is the first gene found to regulate the stability of the membrane.”  Their results are especially interesting because they found that cell death caused by leakage in the lysosomes of glioblastoma can be activated by using drugs that cross the blood-brain barrier” and in this study they used the antihistamine clemastine.

In cell cultures the antihistamine in lysosome-initiated cell death in glioblastoma cells were at concentrations that has no significant effect on healthy cells of different types.  In mouse models it was effective in reducing the spread of brain tumors and improving the survival rates of the animals. In the most invasive brain tumor model, the antihistamine resulted in the disappearance of the entire tumor.

 

 

 

How Much Coffee is too Much?

Wednesday, July 10th, 2019

 

A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that drinking 6 or more cups of coffee daily may be detrimental to your lealth by increasing your risk of heart disease by up to 22%. This is the first study to study the upper limits of coffee caffeine and heart disease. In the study 347,077 participants from the United Kindom Biobank, aged 37 to 73 were evaluated in terms of the risk of cardiovascular disease in line with coffee consumption and genetic variations by focusing on the ability of the caffeine-metabolizing gene (CYP1A2) to better process caffeine. Researchers concluded that despite carriers of the fast processing gene variation being 4 times quicker at metabolizing caffeine, the research did not support the belief that these people could safely consume more caffeine, more frequently withlout detrimental health effects.   Thus, moderation in coffee consumption is need for heart health.

Some Breast Cancer Patients Benefit from Tart Cherry That Reduced Joint Pain, and Sore Muscles

Wednesday, July 3rd, 2019

A new study reported in Science Daily concluded that tart cherry decreases joint pain and sore muscles in some breast cancer patients by reducing the musculoskeletal effects of aramatrase inhibitors. These inhibitors are a standard treatment for hormone receptive-positive breast cancer in postmenopausal women and help prevent recurrence by inhibiyting the action of amomatasew that is an enzymew that converts androgens to estrogens. Almopst half of women who use this treatment have joint and muscle pain that can be debilitating and may cause patients to stop treatment.

In the random, double-bind study women were plaqced in a group that received 1 ounce of tart cherry concentrate in 8 ounces of water dailyfor 6 weeks with a group who received a placebo. All had stage 1,2,3 non-metastatic breast cancer.  The study continued through May 2016 to August 2018 and 60 patients were enrolled.  Patients documented their pain intensity at the start of the study, weekly and at the end of the study. Patients who completed the study reported a 34.7% mean decrease in pain compared to 1.4% in the placebo group.  Recearchers say the flavonoids and anthocyanins in the tart cherry have an anti-inflammatory properties that may play a role in reducing the side effects observed. There was a statistical significant difference in the pain levels experienced by patients in the group that received the tart cherry.

Radiation Increases Cardiac Problems for Lung Cancer Patients

Wednesday, June 26th, 2019

A new study published in the Journal of the American College of Carediology concluded that thoracic radiotherapy for lung cancer patients led to more than 10% of patients having heart attacks, heart failure, and other cardiac problems. Rates for those considered at high risk for cardiac problems were even higher for those with no history of cardiovascular disease.

In the study researchers evaluated data for 748 patients with non-small cell lung cancer and found a direct correlation between increaqsed dosages of heart radiation exposure and the riusk of cardiac problems. Researchers concluded that patients should receive lower dosages of radiation than national guidelines recomment and should be 10 gray units compared to 20. In addition, researchers recommended finding ways to mitigate the harmful effects of radiation.

Irregular Sleep Patterns associated with several Metabolic Disorders

Wednesday, June 19th, 2019

A new study in Diabetic Care reported that not following a regular bedtime and wake up schedule and getting different amounts of sleep each night can put people at higher risks for obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension, high blood sugar, and other metabolic disorders. In fact, they found that for every hour of variation in bed time and time asleep, a person can have up to a 27% greater chance of experiencing a metabolic abnormality. Past studies have shown a link between insufficient sleep and metabilic disorders but had not evaluated the factor of irregular sleep and disorders. This research showed that even after considering the amount of sleep a person gets and other lifestyle factors, everyt one hour night to night difference in bed time or the duration of a nights sleep multiplies the adverse metabolic effect.

In this study researchers followed 2003 men and women, ages 45 to 84, participating in the NHLBl-funded Multi-Ethnic Srtudy of Atherosclerosis. Subjects were followed for a median of 6 years to evaluate the relatiopnship between sleep regularity and metabolivc effects. Subjects wore actigraph wrist ewatches to closely tract sleep schedules and to provide objectivity for seven consecutive days.  They also kept a sleep  diary and responded to standard questionaires about sleep habits and other lifestyle and health factors. The actigraphic tracking took place between 2010 and 2013 and subjects were followed to 2016-2017. Results showed the variations in sleep duration and bedtimes preceded the development of metaboliv disorders and provides some evidence supporting a causal link between iurregular sleep and metabolic disfunction.  Other findings include that participants whose sleep varied more than one hour were more likely to be African-American, work non-day shift schedules, smoked, and had shorter sleep duration.  This group also had higher rates of depression symptoms, total caloric intake, and index of sleep apnea.  Researchers said that increasing sleep duration or bedtime variation was strongly associated with multiple metabolic and simultaneous problems such as lower HDL cholesterol. and higher waist circumference, blood pressure,  total triglycerides, and fasting glucose. In summary, maintaining as regular sleep schedule has beneficial metabolic effects.

New Early Blood Test for Lung Cancer detection.

Wednesday, June 5th, 2019

Holistic-Health-Show-with-Dr-Carl-O-Helvie

The Arizona Daily Star reported a study on a new blood test to identify to detect and quantify early cancer cells carried out at the University of Arizona. Researchers combined the latest in epigenetics that reports genes that turn on and off with informatics that includes advanced data-processing and analytics. Researchers said they could successfully detect early stage lung cancer that iws commercialized in a new company, DesertDx LLC.

The test is based on a process called methylation by which cancer disrupts the DNA makeup. It recognizes biological markers for methylation to detect and quantify the presence of cancer cells.  These markers allow doctors to evaluate the effectiveness of surgery by comparing the markers before and after surgery.  It also allows clinicians to assess for recurrence of cancer.  One authority said it is best used in conjunction with computerized tomography, of CT scans.  He continues on to say “You might see a nodule in a CT scan image, but up until now we haven’t had an easy way to know if what we see is cancerous or benign. The only way is a tissue biopsy.”  “This blood test allows us to characterize what we’re able to see in a scan and say whether it’s cancer or not, all using a routine blood draw.”

Researchers report Antibiotics in World Rivers Exceed Safe Limits up to 300 times.

Wednesday, May 29th, 2019

 

Holistic-Health-Show-with-Dr-Carl-O-Helvie

In a study presented at the annual meeting of the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC) in Helsinki on May 27 and 28 researchers reported on levels of antibiotics in the worlds rivers which was a first for this type of study. They compared the assessed levels in rivers with established safe levels  by the AMR Industry Alliance , which depending upon the antibiotic may range from 20 to 32,000ng/l.

Researchers reported that concentrations of antibiotics found in some of the world’s rivers exceed safe’ levels by up to 300 times. They assessed for 14 commonly used antibiotics in rivers in 72 countries in six continents and found antibiotics at 65% of the sites monitored. The most prevalent antibiotic was trimethoprim, used to treat urinary track infections, which was found at 307 of the 711 sites.   In the River Thames and one of its tributaries in London, the researchers found a total antibiotic concentration of 233 nanograms per litre (ng/l), whereas in Bangladesh the concentration was 170 times higher. Ciproflaxacin, used to treat bacterial infections, most frequently exceeded safe levels, surpassing the safety levels in 51 places. Metronidazole, also used to treat bacterial infections including skin and mouth infections, exceeded safe levels by the biggest margin, with concentrations at one site in Bangladesh 300 times greater than the ‘safe’ level.

The ‘safe’ limits were most frequently exceeded in Asia and Africa, but sites in Europe, North America and South America also had elevated levels showing that antibiotic contamination is a “global problem.” Sites where antibiotics exceeded ‘safe’ levels by the greatest degree were in Bangladesh, Kenya, Ghana, Pakistan and Nigeria.  A site in Austria was ranked the highest of the European sites monitored. Researchers found that high-risk sites were often near wastewater treatment systems, waste or sewage dumps and in some areas of political turmoil

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Longevity/Fasting/Stem Cells and Dr Valter Longo, the Guru of Longevity

Sunday, July 15th, 2018

Professor Valter Longo is internationally recognized as a leader in the field of ageing studies and related diseases. His discoveries include some of the major genetic pathways that regulate aging and life-threatening diseases and the identification of a genetic mutation that protects men from several common diseases.

He is a Professor of Gerontology and Biological Science and Director of the Longevity Institution at the School of Gerontology at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, one of the leading centers devoted to teaching and research on ageing. He is also director of the Oncology Laboratory and longevity at the Institute of Molecular Oncology IFOM in Milan.

Professor Longo received the Nathan Shock Lecture Award from the National Institute on Ageing (NIA/NIH) in 2010 and in 2013 the Vincent Cristofalo ‘Rising Star’ Award for Research on Ageing, and the 2016 Glenn Award for research in the Biology of Aging.

In 2015, after a number of his papers were among the most widely cited in the biomedical field, Time magazine called him a ‘guru of longevity’.

Doctor Longo received a PhD from North Texas in 1992, and another one from UCLA in 1997 and completed post doctoral training in 2000. He has carried out research in the areas of fasting and longevity, cell biology and genetics, the regulation of aging and multiple  stress resistance systems in yeast and mammals, cancer, diabetes and Alzheimer’s.  He has over 70 peer reviewed articles, 4 books/chapters, multiple research grants, active grant reviewer, and student research advisor. He is author of the best seller The Longevity Diet: Discover the New Science Behind Stem Cell Activation and Regeneration to Slow Aging, Fight Disease, and Optimize Weight

More information is available at:                                                                              http://gero.usc.edu/cv2013/CV-LongoV2013.pdf

www.CreateCures.org

Enjoy the Interview Below:

 

Childhood Cancer Survivors at Increased Risk of Adult Heart Problems

Wednesday, March 28th, 2018

A new study published in the European Heart Journal concluded that survivors of childhood cancer are at increased risk of suffering prematurely from cardiovascular disease in adulthood.

In the study survivors of childhood cancer were followed into adulthood and compared with a non cancer sample from the general population,. The study population as adults were at higher risk of high blood pressure and dyslipidaemia (unusually high levels of cholesterol and other fats in the blood)  These conditions appeared 6 and 8 years earlier than in the general population controls. In addition, the childhood survivors had a nearly two fold increase risk of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, and venous thromboembolism. Cardiovascular  disease was found in 4.5% of survivors and occurred in the majority before the age of 40 and nearly eight years earlier than the general population control.

Between October 2013 and February, 2016, a total of 951 adult long term survivors of childhood cancer underwent a clinical exam that included assessing factors that might put them at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, such as high blood pressure, and dyslipidaemia. Their medical history such as whether or not they smoked and whether there were family members with a history of cardiovascular disease was examined. The survivors ages range from 23 to 48 at follow up and the general population control numbered 15,000. Researchers concluded “Our results show that these survivors of childhood cancer have a substantially elevated burden of prematurely occurring traditional cardiovascular risk factors and cardiovascular disease.” Many of the survivors were unaware of their cardiovascular risk prior to the study.

The most common cardiovascular risk factors identified were high blood pressure and dyslipidaemia that involved 23% and 28% respectively whereas diabetes was only found in 2%. These conditions also occurred earlier than in the general population control.  At least one cardiovascular disease was found in 4.5% of the survivors and tthe most common was that affected 2%. venous thromboembolism.  In addition, 1.2% had congestive heart failure, 0.5% had stroke or peripheral artery disease,, and 0.4% had atrial fibrillation.

Researchers said treatment of childhood cancer include chemotherapy and radiation can affect the heart causing temporary or permanent damage to heart cells and blood vessels. Further research is planned.

 

Dr William Bengston cures Cancer in Mice with Energy Healing.

Sunday, March 25th, 2018

Dr William F. Bengston is a professor of statistics and research methods, and the President of the Society for Scientific Exploration, an international group of scientists and researchers who study anomalies.  Dr. Bengston has been researching anomalous healing for over thirty five years, and has numerous publications in scientific journals.  He has also lectured widely in the U.S., Canada, and Europe.

His memoir, The Energy Cure, is published by Sounds True.  Bill’s research has produced the first successful full cures of transplanted mammary cancer and methylcholanthrene induced sarcomas in mice by energy healing techniques that he helped to develop.  He has also investigated assorted correlates to healing such as EEG and fMRI entrainment, and geomagnetic micropulsation anomalies in healing space.  His current research focuses on the attempt to record and store healing in both biological and physical systems, and to be able to reproduce the healing effect without the healer.

Enjoy the Interview below: