Posts Tagged ‘skin cancer’

Some skin bacteria may protect against cancer.

Wednesday, March 7th, 2018

A new study published in Science Advances concluded that there is a potential role for some bacteria on the skin—protecting against cancer. S epidermidis. a common bacteria on healthy skin, exerts a selective ability to inhibit the growth of some cancers, They said “This unique strain of skin bacteria produces a chemical that kills several types of cancer cells but does not appear to be toxic to normal cells.” The researchers found that S epidermidis strain produces the chemical compound SN-hydroxyaminoporine (6-HAP) s  epidermidis on their skin. The mice that did not make 6-HAP had many skin tumors after being exposed to cancer-causing ultraviolet rays but mice with S epidermidis strain producing 6-HAP did not. 6-HAP is a molecule that impairs the creation of DNA , known as DNA synthesis, and prevents the spread of transformed cancer cells as well as the potential to suppress the development of ultraviolet induces skin cancers.

Mice receiving intravenous injections of 6-HAP every 48 hours over a two week period experienced no apparent side effects, but when transplanted with melanoma cells, their tumor size was suppressed by more than 50 percent compared to the control group., They said “There is increasing evidence that the skin microbiome is an important element of human health. In fact, we previously reported that some bacteria on our skin produce antimicrobial peptides that defend against pathogenic bacteria such as Staph aureus.”However, they said further study is needed to determine how 6-HAP is produced, if it can be used for prevention of cancer, or if loss of 8-FAP increases cancer risk.

Does Sunscreen Fully Protect You Against Melanoma?

Friday, July 25th, 2014

logo1267406_md

A new study published in Nature concluded that sunscreens do not protect totally against the development of skin cancer. Using geneticalluy modified mice suceptible to melanoma the researchers disproved that ultraviolet light causes mutations in the DNA of melenocytes in a gene called p53. P53 is one of the genes considered a guardian  of the genome that is  key in detecting and repairing damage accumulatjng in cells from ul;traviolet light  and is a major barrier for the body against cancer. They found that sunscreen protects against immediate radiation damage including sunburn, but the radiation can penetrate and damage the DNA cells and as a result cause cancer.

Can Broccoll Reduce the Risk of Skin Cancer?

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

logo1267406_mdA  new study from the U of Arizona is evaluating whether the use of sulforaphane, a naturally occurring– compound  from broccoli with known chemo preventive properties, placed on the skin can act as a preventive for skin cancer. Dr Sally Dickinson says “Even though there is heightened awareness about the needs for limiting sun exposure and use of sun screen, we’re still seeing far too many cases of skin cancer each year.” : We’re searching for better methods to prevent skin cancer in formats that are affordable and manageable for public use. Sulforaphane may be an excellent candidate for use in the prevention of skin cancer caused by exposure to ultraviolet rays.”

Dr Dickinson’s research has shown that sulforaphane is a highly adaptable and effective agent for inhibiting cancer causing pathways (such as the AP-1 protein) while activating chemo protective genes (such as the Nrf2 gene). He current research done in collaboration with Johns Hopkins University will test a topical broccoli sprout solution on the skin or a group of people to see if the compound is effective in the context of solar simulated light. The extract has been shown to be safe for both topical and oral administration.

Can Your Sunscreen Increase Your Risk of Skin Cancer?

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

A study published on the Missouri University of Science and Technology website and to be published in Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology concluded that sunscreen may not be as safe against skin cancer as previously believed. Building on previous published research the researchers concluded that when exposed to sunlight, zinc oxide, a common ingredient in sunscreens undergoes a chemical reaction releasing unstable molecules (free radicals). These seek to bond with other free radicals and in the process can damage cells or the DNA within the cells which, in turn, increases the risk of skin cancer. There is a direct relationship between the length of time the zinc is exposed to sunlight and the potential for cell damage.

The researcher studied the reaction of human lung cells immersed in a solution containing nano-particles of zinc oxide to exposure of different types of light over different time frames. A control of human lung cells was included that was not immersed in zinc oxide. Comparing the groups the researcher found the zinc oxide exposed cells deteriorated quicker than those not immersed in the chemical compound. He also found that when the cells exposed to zinc oxide were exposed to ultra-violet rays for 3 hours, half of the cells died, and aft3er 12 hours 90% had died. Because his research is in the early stages, the researcher cautions people from drawing conclusions about the safety of sunscreens until more research is completed. He says “I still advise people to wear susnsreen. Sunscreen is better than no protection at all..”

During What Period of the Life Cycle Does Most Cancer Causing Skin Damage Occur?

Friday, May 25th, 2012

A new study reported on several news sites and to be published in the next issue of Science of the Total Environment concluded that UV exposure during a person’s first 18 years of life was the most critical fopr cancer-causing skin damage and skin aging. Although skin degradation continues after age 50 and skin protection  must continue but the major damage is done while a child and teenager.

One hundred and eighty people between age 18 and 83 years of age were imaged with the UV camera and interviewed to determine their level of sun exposure. A unique, non-invasive “UV camera” that took images of skin damage and aging invisible to the naked eye was used to measure the relationship between lifetime sun exposure and skin cancer risks. This allowed examination of  people’s skin  for skin cancer risk factors without an invasive biopsy. Hyper pigmentation of skin was measured to determine levels of damage and wrinkles to indicate skin aging.  The researchers said the message of the research is to look after your skin as a chid and teenager to prevent skin damage and wrinkles.

Are Exercise and Caffeine Protective Against Sun Exposure Skin Cancer?

Friday, April 13th, 2012

A new study reported at the American Association of Cancer Research last week concluded that the combined effects of exercise and caffeine consumption may prevent skin cancer and also prevent inflammation related to other obesity-linked diseases. These results were found in a mouse model study but the researcher believes  “we may extrapolate these findings to humans and anticipates that we we would benefit from these combination treatments as well.”

Using mice at high risk of developing skin cancer researchers evaluated the effects of caffeine and exercise and found that mice that took a dose of caffeine and exercised on a running wheel had 62% fewer skin tumors. In addition, the volume of tumors also decreased by 85% compared with mice that did not exercise or take caffeine.  Positive effects were also found for either intervention alone but to a lesser degree.  Findings were a 27% reduction in skin tumors for caffeine only mice and a 61% reduction in tumor size. They found the tumor activity was reduced by 35% and the tumor volume by 70% in exercise-only mice. They also found that combined exercise and caffeine reduced weight and inflammation when mice were fed a high-fat diet of omega-6 fatty acid-rich  foods for two weeks.  These results were again higher when the two interventions were combined than with either one alone.

Does Smoking Increase the Risk of Squamous Cell Carcinoma?

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

In a recent study published in Cancer Causes Control researchers concluded that women with non-melanoma skin cancers were more likely to have smoked cigarettes than women without skin cancer. In the study researchers evaluated the relationship between cigarette smoking and non-melanoma skin cancers including basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Smoking histories were compared between subjects diagnosed with BCC and/or SCC and controls who were screened for skin cancer but were not diagnosed nor had a history of skin cancer.
There were 689 subjects (383 with skin cancer and 315 controls and 355 men and 343 women and all were white) in the study and questions were asked about years of smoking, how many cigarettes daily, and when those who once smoked had quit as part of the assessment. Results were stratified by sex and showed that smoking was associated with non-melanoma skin cancer overall, and that the risk increased by number of cigarettes daily, total years of smoking and pack-year smoked. Associations were especially strong for SCC in women which was more than two times as likely in those who had smoked for 20 or more years compared to the controls.
Among men there were positive associations between smoking and BCC and SCC but none were statistically significant. “However, among women, smoking was not associated with BCC, while highly statistically significant associations were observed for SCC. Women with SCC were almost two times more likely to have smoked 20 years or more. Men who had BCC were significantly more likely to have smoked for at least 20 years than men without cancer. A;though the study did find an association between smoking and skin cancer it did not prove a cause and effect. More research is needed.

Enjoy Your Coffee Caffeine On Your Skin- It May Prevent Some Skin Cancers

Thursday, September 8th, 2011

logo1267406_md

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science discussed the mechanism of how caffeine might protect against certain skin cancers and that could lead to better sunscreens. Suspecting that the response of a gene called ATR that is suppressed when caffeine molecules are around might be involved in the protective role of caffeine, researchers created genetically modified mice whose ATR genes were deficient and then exposed them to ultraviolet light until they developed skin cancer. After 19 weeks of IV exposure, they found that these mice developed 69% fewer tumors than those that had fully functioning ATR genes. In addition, the tumors in the genetically modified mice developed three weeks later than in the control group. After 34 weeks of UV exposure, all mice developed tumors, mainly a non-melanoma type called squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). They concluded ” All of this suggests the possibility that caffeine, possibly (ap0plied to the skin)), would have an inhibitory effect on sunlight induced skin cancer.”

Skin Cancer Risk and Vitamin D Levels

Friday, August 26th, 2011

logo1267406_md

A new study reported online in the Archives of Dermatology concluded that as individual’s vitamin D level increases their risk for nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) also seems to increase but factors such as untraviolet (UV) radiation exposure may complicate this relationship. The study was carried out among 3,223 white subjects in a health maintenance organization (HMO) with a high probability of developing NMSC, Between January 1997 and December 2001, subjects were assessed for levels of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (an indication of vitamin D levels), and parathyroid hormones, creatinine and calcium levels. Over 2/3 of the participants (n=2,257) seemed to have insufficient levels of vitamin D and the diagnoses of NMSC were made in 240 individuals including 49 with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 163 individuals with basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and 28 individuals with both (all forms of NMSC). Individuals who were not deficient in vitamin D seemed to have an increase risk of developing NMSC and although this relationship was positive it was not statistically significant for tumors developing on body parts routinely exposed to UV radiation suh as arms and legs. More research is needed in this area of study.

High Intake of Dietary Phosphate May Be Associated with Skin Cancer

Friday, April 2nd, 2010

logo1267406_md

Results of a study published in Cancer Prevention Research concluded that a high dietary intake of phosphate promotes tumor formation in an animal model of skin cancer.

Researchers applied a carcinogen found in cigarette smoke (dimethylbenzanthracene) to the skin of mice and then applied another chemical that stimulates cell growth. Mice were then fed a high phosphate diet (1.2% by weight) or a low phosphate diet
(0.2 percent). Those fed a high phosphate diet had 50 percent more skin papilla (initial stage of skin cancer development) compared to those on a low phosphate diet.

Although phosphate is a very important nutrient its intake has
increase dramatically over the past 30 years according public health researchers who say it has been added as an additive in processed foods such as meats, baked goods and soft drinks.

The researchers estimated a human dietary equivalent to the high phosphate diet of the mice would be 1,800 milligrams daily and that is a level many humans match or exceed. The human equivalent of a low phosphate diet would be 500 milligrams.

In 2006 the Department of Agriculture said the average phosphate intake of American male and females over two years of age was 1,334mg and the recommended daily allowance was 1,250 for pre-teens and teenagers and 700mg for adults.

The authors said that a low phosphate diet may help prevent cancer based upon these results obtained with a mouse model.