Link for food glycemic index and lung cancer?

 

logo1267406_mdA new study in Cancer Epidemiology: Biomarkers and Prevention concluded that eating a diet with a high glycemic index was independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in a non-Hispanic white population. This was the largest study to investigate the potential link between glycemic index and lung cancer and also found the glycemic index was significantly associated with lung cancer risk in particular subgroups, such as never-smoked, those diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) subtype of lung cancer. Diet and lung cancer have been associated in the past and diets high in fruit and vegetables may decrease the risk whereas increased consumption of red meat, saturated fats and dairy products have shown increased lung cancer.

In the study 1,905 newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 2,413 healthy individuals were studied. Each self-reported past dietary habits and health histories and the flycemic index and glycemic load were determined using published glycemic index values, subjects. In addition,  were then divided into 5 equal groups based upon the glycemic index and glycemic load values.  Researchers found a 49 percent increased risk of lung cancer among subjects with the highest daily glycemic index compared to those with the lowest. In addition, the associations were greater among subjects who had never smoked, diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, or had less than 12 years of education.Researchers found that those who never smoked in the highest glycemic index group were more than twice as likely to develop lung cancer as those in the lowest group whereas among smokers the risk was only elevated by 31 percent between the high and low glycemic groups. Those in the high glycemic group were 92 percent more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma than those in the low group.  Among those with fewer years of education than 12 years subjects in the highest glycemic index group were 77 percent more likely to develop lung cancer than those in the low glycemic group compared to 13 percent in subjects with more than 12 years education. .Researchers thought this might relate to poor diet and smoking.

Likewise, glycemic index had no significant association with lung cancer suggesting “it is the average quality, instead of quantity, of carbohydrates consumed that may modulate lung cancer risks.” Researchers pointed out the limitations of the study and made suggestions for further research.

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