Archive for the ‘cannabis’ Category

CBD/Hemp/THC Uses in Health interview with Robin Ashley

Sunday, July 30th, 2017

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

CBD/THC discussion and availability through my second guest, Robin Ashley who grew up in Colorado where  she learned to both love and respect nature and our planet, her deep love for animals eventually guided her to living a vegan lifestyle.

Robin has been passionate about natural health since 2003, when her beloved cocker spaniel, Jessie, became extremely ill and the vet informed her that ‘nothing could be done’. Not believing this was true, she began desperately researching then trying natural cures, and within just 30 days, Jessie was back to full health. As remarkable as this was, it was not the reason Robin became passionate about natural health. It was actually the response from the vet that opened her eyes to what Western medicine was all about.

When Robin took Jessie back to the vet for a check up, she was anxious to share with him what she had done that resulted in a total reversal of Jessie’s condition. The vet admitted himself that he could not believe this was the same dog and asked Robin what she had done. Excitedly, she gave him all the details! When she was finished he said that he was very happy for her and Jessie, but that he could not share this information with anyone else. When she asked why, the vet replied, because it’s not medicine.

Robin left the vet’s office that day angry and confused, she didn’t understand why he felt that organic foods and herbs were not medicine, especially since it was the father of medicine, Hippocrates who said, “Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food.”

Since that day, Robin has spent thousands of hours researching natural health, every time she come across a new product or modality she would learn everything she could about its benefits. She is grateful to have come across several things that have improved her own health as well as the health of the people and animals she loves. However, nothing has had a bigger impact on her health and overall life, than CBD Hemp Oil!

 

Because of her personal life changing experience with CBD, she is on a mission to share this information and the CBD products that helped her with the world. She has been doing this only since September of 2016, but has already witnessed several others having dramatic and positive improvements in their health. Robin believes very strongly that she would not be here today had it not been for her very good friends sharing CBD with her.

Knowing that there are countless others who have been told by well meaning doctors that ‘nothing can be done’ to help them with their current health challenges, Robin has made it her life’s mission and full time career to be a CBD Educator. She says, “We have all been told things that quite simply are not true, and people have suffered needlessly for years because of it. I am eager to share the truth with anyone who is open minded enough to listen.”

Robin is happy to speak to large groups, do a one on one call, or anything in between. Every time someone shares their success story with her, she becomes even more determined to spread the word. More information is available at: https://www.linkedin.com/in/damon-ashley-b3b2b2b0/      See  www.echoconnections,org      and www.CBDwillchangeyourlife.com  

See the Interview with Jann Holden, part 2 for Robin Ashley

Cannabis Extract Expert, Mara Gordon, Speaks on the Holistic Health Show

Sunday, July 16th, 2017

Mara Gordon, founder, Chief Process Engineer, specializes in the development of cannabis extract treatment protocols for seriously ill patients in California. She is the co-founder of Aunt Zelda’s, Calla Spring Wellness, and Zelda Therapeutics.

Prior to Aunt Zelda’s, Mara worked as a process engineer, helping Fortune 500 companies create intelligent software by utilizing the Rational Unified Process. This experience has enabled her to take a detailed and scientific approach to medical cannabis.

Recognizing a need for patient-focused software, Gordon created CDRMed, an EMR specially developed for the healthcare community. With CDRMed, physicians and medical health professionals are able to make treatment recommendations based on the latest and highest-quality data. This takes the guesswork out of selecting the correct medicines at the dispensary.

Gordon sits on the boards of Zelda Therapeutics, Daya Foundation, International Cannabis Standards Board (ICSB), and Hmbldt. She has presented at multiple CME-accredited medical conferences, including Patients Out of Time 2014, and at POT 2016, delivered a 3.5 hour course along with Drs Cristina Sanchez, Manuel Guzman, and Joe D. Goldstrich. Gordon has spoken at medical cannabis conferences in Australia, Costa Rica, Chile, Colombia, the Czech Republic, Israel, as well as numerous events throughout the USA and worldwide. These include CannMed held at Harvard Medical School in April 2016, and Medical Marijuana for Professionals 2014 and 2016. Her work is featured in the upcoming documentaries, “Weed the People”, “Mary Janes: Women of Weed”, and in Joe Dolce’s book, “Brave New Weed”.More information at: https://www.medicaljane.com/directory/professional/mara-gordon/  

Enjoy the Interview below:

Cannabis Health Risk Lowered with Public Health Guidelines

Wednesday, June 28th, 2017

A new study published in the American Journal of Public Health reported that Canada’s Lower Risk Cannabis Use Guidelines that were released with the endorsement of key public health and medical organizations provide ten science-based recommendations to enable cannabis users to reduce their health risk. Canada has one of the highest cannabis use rates in the world and related problems range from memory and physical coordination problems, to motor vehicle accidents and mental health or dependence problems.

Researchers noted that as Canada moves toward legalization with the federal Cannabis Act it was a good time to educate and inform cannabis users on order to reduce or prevent cannabis-related health issues. They said “Factual, science-based information can provide guidance to cannabis users to make choices that reduce both immediate and long-term risks top their health.” They continue “Cannabis use carries with it real health risks, and mitigating those risks for Canadians–particularly young Canadians–must be the first priority.” “The CMA (Canadian Medical Association) continues to recommend a broad policy approach focused in preventing problematic drug use, ensuring the availability of assessment and treatment services for those who wish to stop using, and harm reduction to increase the safety for those who are using.”

Guidelines include abstaining, and the elevated potential of  risk related to initiating use at an young age, using high potency products, alternative delivery system, heavy use and driving, and identifying people at higher risks of problems with concrete recommendations for risk reduction in each case.

Low dose THC relieves stress, but more has opposite effect.

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017

Research published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence concluded that low levels of Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) , the main psychoactive compound in Marijuana does reduce stress, but in a highly dose-dependent manner. They found very low doses lessened the anxiety of a public speaking task but slightly higher doses actually increased anxiety. Researchers said “We found that THC at low doses reduce stress, while higher doses had the opposite effect, underscoring the importance of dose when it comes to THC and its effect.”  They pointed out that few studies previously looked at the effects of THC on stress and the differences related to dose because of the difficulty of obtaining samples and the regulation of the category 1 substance.

Healthy volunteers age 18 to 40 who had some experience with cannabis use but not daily users  were recruited for the study. They were randomly divided into 3 groups: 1) the low dose group received one capsule of 7.5 mg THC daily: 2) the moderate group received a capsule of 12.5 mg daily: and 3) the placebo group received a capsule containing none. Neither researchers or group members knew who was receiving what dose. Researchers said: The doses used in the study produce effects that are equivalent to only a few puffs of a cannabis cigarette.” Researchers further said it is difficult to compare doses of smoked cannabis to doses of engested THC. “We didn’t want to include larger doses because we wanted to avoid potential adverse effects or cardiovascular effects that can result from higher doses of THC.”

Subjects attended  two four hour sessions with researchers five days apart. At each session they took their capsules  and then relaxed for two hours to allow the RHC to be absorbed. During one session subjects were asked ro spend 10 minutes preparing for a mock job interview. This was followed by a 5 minute interview with a lab assistant who did not offer feedback. They were then asked to count backwards from a five digit number by subtracting 13 for 5 minutes. According to the researcher this task is very stress producing.

In their second visit subjects were asked to talk with lab assistants about a favorite book or movie for five minutes and then play solitaire for five minutes.  Before, during and after each activity subjects were asked to rate their stress levels and feelings about the tasks. In addition, blood pressure, heart rate, and cortisol levels  (a key stress hormone) were measured. Those who received 7.5mg of THC reported less stress after the psycho-social test than those given a placebo and their stress levels dissipated faster after the test.  Subjects who received 12.5 mg of THC reported greater negative mood before and throughout the task, and were more likely to rate the psychosocial task as challenging and threatening beforehand and had more pauses during the mock interview compared to those in the placebo group. Researchers concluded “Our findings provide some support for the common claim that cannabis is used to reduce stress and relieve tension and anxiety.” “At the same time, our findings our finding that participants in the higher THC group reported smaller but significant increases in anxiety and negative mood   throughout the test  supports the idea that  THC can also produce the opposite effect.?

Cannabis/Chris Conrad & Constance Finley

Sunday, May 14th, 2017

C Conrad

Chris Conrad (born March 10, 1953) is an American author, activist, curator, publisher and court-recognized expert in cannabis cultivation and use. He has played a key role in the shaping of the modern industrial and medical cannabis reform movements as the author of such seminal books as Hemp: Lifeline to the Future (1993) and Hemp for Health (1997), as well as through his activist work as the co-founder and first President of the Hemp Industries Association (HIA), founder of the Business Alliance in Commerce and Hemp (BACH), and the signature gathering coordinator for the Proposition 215 volunteer effort which made California the first US state to legalize the medical use of cannabis.[1] The December, 1999 issue of High Times ranked Conrad #10 on its list of top 25 “living legends in the battle for legal cannabi

Conrad’s writing career began when he designed and edited a revised edition of the hemp prohibition classic The Emperor Wears No Clothes by Jack Herer in 1990. He followed this with the publication of Hemp: Lifeline to the Future (1993), which was subsequently translated into Italian, and Hemp for Health (1997),[6] which was subsequently translated into Spanish Portuguese, Czech and German. He is also the author of Cannabis Yields and Dosages (2004) and Nostradamus and the Attack on New York.

Conrad has co-authored two books with collaborators Virginia Resner and his wife Mikki Norris: Shattered Lives: Portraits From America’s Drug War   and Human Rights and the US Drug War.

In 2007, Conrad contributed a chapter on cannabis history to Pourquoi & Comment Cultiver Du Chanvre by Michka,[12] where his writing appeared alongside contributions from other notable authors such as Jorge Cervantes, Raphael Mechoulam and Stephen Jay Gould.

In 1989, Conrad and his wife Mikki Norris co-founded the American Hemp Council, with the purpose of educating the American public on the many uses of industrial hemp and the laws against the crop in the United States.

In 1996, in the final weeks of the campaign (after the money came in and he was hired to do so), Conrad became the signature-gathering coordinator for the volunteer effort to pass California’s Proposition 215, the initiative which would go on to make the state the first in the US to legalize the medical use of marijuana.[14] He was also a vocal supporter of California’s Proposition 19 in 2010, which came within four points of making California the first state to legalize all adult uses of cannabis.[

Conrad has also been active in the movement to legalize industrial hemp, serving as the first president of the Hemp Industries Association (HIA) and founding the Business Alliance of Commerce in Hemp (BACH).

Since 2007, Conrad has taught at Oaksterdam University’s Oakland, California campus, where he teaches the history and politics of cannabis.

In 1993 and 2000, Conrad curated and designed the Hash-Marijuana-Hemp Museum in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. In 1995, Conrad and his wife Mikki Norris partnered with Virginia Resner to create and curate the “Human Rights ’95: Atrocities of the Drug War” photo exhibit to put a human face on non-violent prisoners of the Drug War and to show how the Drug War operates through their stories. Launched at the Fort Mason Center in San Francisco on June 24, 1995 for the 50th Anniversary the United Nations, the exhibit was put in context of the UN’s Declaration on Human Rights. The grand opening presented a program called, “Give Drug Peace a Chance,” that included Ram Dass, Paul Krassner, Jello Biafra, Ngaio Bealum, New Riders of the Purple Sage, and Terence Hallinan. They toured with this exhibit for many years, creating smaller excerpted displays that were shown at libraries, universities, conferences, and events under the name “Human Rights and the Drug War.” From 2011 to the present, Conrad has curated the Oaksterdam Cannabis Museum in Oakland, California.In 2014, Conrad and his wife Mikki Norris were jointly awarded the Seattle Hempfest Outstanding Cannabis Activist Award in recognition of their writing and advocacy work.

In 2010, Conrad was the recipient of Oaksterdam University’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

In 2004, Conrad and Norris received the Outstanding Citizen Activism Award at the 2004 national NORML conference.

In 2001, Conrad and Norris received the Drug Policy Alliance’s Robert C. Randall Award for Achievement in the Field of Citizen Action, along with collaborator Virginia Resner, Randy Credico of the William Moses Kunstler Fund for Racial Justice and Nora Callahan of the November Coalition.

The above information was taken from Wikipedia where Chris is listed.

ConstanceFinley

Constance Finley, founder and CEO of Constance Therapeutics, was inspired by her own personal experience with a chronic illness. After nearly dying from the pharmaceuticals prescribed to help alleviate pain and inflammation caused by a rare autoimmune disease, Finley turned to medical cannabis for relief.

She quickly became fascinated with the science behind the medicinal benefits of cannabis. Studies have found that cannabinoids, like THC and CBD, are more effective when working in tandem with the entire phytochemical profile of the female cannabis flower versus working in isolation – what is known as “The Entourage Effect.” Based on her research, Finley became determined to make standardized, whole plant cannabis extracts that incorporate all the naturally occurring cannabinoids, terpenes and flavonoids in cannabis, and are safe for those with compromised immune systems.

Prior to Constance Therapeutics, Finley was founder and CEO of Housing Allies, Inc. She pioneered the use of tax credits to create high-quality, aesthetically delightful low-income housing for the working poor and ill, utilizing corporate investments motivated by financial tax benefits. Finley also worked as a clinical psychologist and taught psychology courses at Naropa University, Greeley Junior College and Lone Mountain College. She holds a Master of Arts in Clinical Psychology from the University of San Francisco, where she graduated first in her class, and a Bachelor of Arts in Eastern Studies and Psychology from Lone Mountain College, where she graduated summa cum laude.