Posts Tagged ‘cadmium’

Dr Rich Snyder (Kidney Disease) and Dr Larry Hoberman (probiotics) Interviewed.

Sunday, October 25th, 2015

Snyder-RichardMy first guest, Dr Rich Snyder is an osteopathic physician board certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology (the study of kidney disease). His areas of specialization include kidney disease, high blood pressure, adrenal health and medical education. He is Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine and Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is the author of five books including Adrenal Fatigue For Dummies and What You Must Know About Kidney Disease: A Practical Guide For Using Conventional and Complementary Treatments. He is also the author of What You Need to Know About Dialysis: The Secret to Surviving and Thriving on Dialysis and is also the High Blood Pressure Expert on About.com

L HobermanMy second guest, Board Certified Gastroenterologist Lawrence Hoberman, MD, is the creator of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic and founder of Medical Care Innovations. He has spent more than 40 years practicing medicine and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology. Frustrated by the lack of options to treat his patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD) in the early 2000s, Dr. Hoberman met with a PhD microbiologist to identify a combination of bacteria that might work to destroy the harmful bacteria living in the intestines, improving and maintaining the health of adults. The result is the development of his own effective probiotic supplement: EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.
Dr. Hoberman currently sees patients as a part of a health and wellness practice that stresses preventative medicine. He is in practice at Health by Design, located in San Antonio, Texas. He is available for speaking engagements about digestive health and the benefits of probiotics and has spoken at several conferences. More information is available at: http://www.endomune.com

Listen to the Interview Below:

 

 

 

Can Cadmium, An Environmental Contaminant, Influence Breast Cancer Cell Growth?

Wednesday, May 2nd, 2012

Recent research presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology reported that breast cancer cells became increasingly aggressive the longer they were exposed to small concentrations of cadmium, a heavy metal found in food, water, air and cosmetics.  This research builds upon earlier research that found a reaction between acute cadmium exposure and breast cancer cell aggression.  Estrogen receptors activation showed a similar hormonal response to low levels of long term cadmium exposure as they had to acute exposure.  In the process of the growth of epithelial cells in normal mammary glands there are circulating levels of estrogen, a hormone produced by the ovaries,  that modulate the growth process and the estrogen is stimulated by estrogen receptors (ER).  Cadmium, like some other heavy metals, can act as an endocrine disruptor and mimic estrogen, thereby disrupting the hormone dependent pathways.

Findings are important because many of the exposures to cadium by women  are low levels over a long period of time (chronic instead of acute).Cadium is mainly a byproduct of mining, smelting, and refining metals such as zinc, lead, and copper and rock mining to produce fertilizer. In addition, cadmium can be found in rechargeable batteries, and cigarette smoke and enters the body through consumption of contaminated food, or water or inhaled as cigarette smoke.

When combined with other studies results show that cadmium has a significant role in the development of breast cancer. The researcher says “Many of us are exposed to very low levels of cadmium from the environment on a daily basis,and our research shows that even small concentrations of this metal at [prolonged exposures can cause breast cancer cell growth.”

Is there a Link between Cadmium in Food and Breat Cancer?

Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

A new study published in Cancer Research concluded that dietary cadmium may lead to an increase risk of breast cancer. Cadmium, a toxic metal, occurs at low concentrations in plants because of contamination of farmlands primarily due to atmospheric deposits and the use of fertilizers.  The main sources of cadmium are found in bread, cereals, potatoes, other root crops and vegetables., foods, that otherwise, are considered healthy.

In this study, the researchers observed 55,987 women for more than 12 years and estimated their dietary cadmium exposure using a food frequency questionnaire.  Two thousand one hundred twelve incidents of breast cancer was observed in the group that included 1,626 estrogen receptor-positive and 290 estrogen receptor negative cases.  Cadmium consumption was divided into 3 groups with the highest compared to the lowest level of exposure.  Overall, a higher exposure to cadmium  was linked with a 21 percent increase in breast cancer and among lean and normal weight women the increase was 27 percent. Both the estrogen receptor-positive and negative tumors had the same risk increase at about 23 percent and those eating a higher amount of whole grain and vegetables had a lower risk of breast cancer  than those eating other foods. The researcher said “it is possible that this healthy diet to some extent can counteract the negative effect of cadimium, but our findings need to be confirmed with further studies.”