Posts Tagged ‘coffee’

Can Coffee Help Prevent Obesity?

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

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A new study published in Pharmecutical Research concluded that a chemical commonly found in coffee may help prevent some of the damaging effects of obesity. Specifically, chlorogenic acid (CGA) found in coffee significantly reduces insulin resistance and accumulation of fat in the livers of mice who were fed a high fat diet. This compound that is found in great abundance in coffee is also found in fruits and vegetables like apples, pears, tomatoes and blueberries.

Two side effects of obesity in addition to weight geinare increased insulin resistance and the accumulation of fat in the liver that can lead to diabetes and poor liver function.  To test the effects of CGA a group of mice were fed a high fat iet for 15 wqeeks and were also injected with a CGA solution twice weekly. Findings showed that the CGA not only effectively prevented weight gaij, but also helped maintaihn normal blood pressure and healthy liver composition. The researchers said “CGA is a powerful antioxidant that reducesinflammation….A lot of evidence suggests that obesity-related diseases are caused by chronic inflammation. so if we can control that, we can hopefully ofset some of the negative effects of excessive weight gain.”

Can Coffee Help Prevent Recurrence of Breast Cancer?

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

logo1267406_mdMail Online reports on research at Lund University in Sweden that concluded that drinking  coffee could decrease the risk of breast cancer recurring in women taking  the widely used drug Tamoxifen. Patients who took the pill along with two or more cups of coffee daily, reported less than half the rate of cancer recurrence, compared to those taking Tamoxifen with one or less cups of coffee daily. -Six hundred breast cancer patients in southern Sweden were followed for an average of 5 years. Approximately 300 took  Tamoxifen that reduces the risk of new tumors by blocking  estrogen receptors. However, it is unknown how the coffee interacts with treatment to reduce recurrence. One theory is that the coffee activates the Tamoxifen to make it more effective. More research is needed to confirm this observational study.

Heavy Coffee Intake Reduces Breast Cancer Risk According to New Study

Wednesday, May 18th, 2011

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A new study reported in Breast Cancer Research online concluded that women who drank at least five cups of coffee daily had a significantly reduced risk of postmenopausal breast cancer However, this association was most strongly observed with ER-negative (estrogen receptor) tumors.

Previous studies have had contradictory results on the association of coffee drinking and breast cancer. Thus, this study included both a large Swedish Study population and a large validation German Study population. The case-controlled studies included 2,818 postmenopausal women with breast cancer and 3,111 age-matched controls. All women were between age 50 and 74, born in Sweden, and living there between 1993 and 1995. The validation German study included 3,464 patients with cancer and 6,657 age-matched controls. Information on breast cancer risk factors, lifestyle factors, and socioeconomic variables were provided by all participants. The strongest association of all risk factors for breast cancer was for heavy coffee drinking and ER-negative breast cancer. The combination of heavy coffee drinking and ER-negative tumors resulted in a 57% reduction in the risk for breast cancer. Analysis of the validation German data confirmed that heavy coffee drinking had a protective effect for ER-negative tumors.

Coffee and Prostate Cancer

Friday, January 8th, 2010

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At last some good news for males who love their daily coffee. Researchers at the American Association for Cancer Research Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research Conference in December reported that men with a higher daily coffee intake had a significantly lower risk of advanced and lethal prostate cancer. Coffee contains antioxidants, minerals and caffeine which could impact cancer risk.
Researchers from Harvard Medical School’s Channing Laboratory and School of Public Health. and from McGill University evaluated data from around 50,000 participants in the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study.
Regular and decaffeinated coffee intake was evaluated in 1986 and every 4 years thereafter until 2006. During that period 4,975 men developed prostate cancer.
Those who drank 6 or more cups of coffee daily had a 19% lower risk of prostate cancer compared with those who did not drink coffee so there was a small protective effect for the coffee drinkers. However, for advanced and fatal cancer rates the risk of each was 59% lower in men who consumed the most coffee and among those who never smoked the risk was 89% lower. Results were similar for regular and decaffeinated coffee. These results are potentially important and should be confirmed by other studies.