Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Tony Samara, Shaman, Interview Available.

Sunday, May 22nd, 2016

Tony Samara

Tony Samara, author of ‘Shaman’s Wisdom,’ ‘The Simplicity of Love Meditation,’ ‘Different Yet the Same,’ ‘Karma, Mantra and Beyond’ and ‘Discover Your Inner Buddha’ was born in England, grew up in Egypt, England, and also in Norway where he discovered the “Zen Buddhist philosophy”.

This discovery eventually led him to the Mount Baldy Zen Center in California, USA, where he learned the spiritual teachings of Kyozan Joshu Sasaki, Roshi. He had curiosity to explore further the essence of spirituality and thus went to live and learn with shamanic communities around the globe. By going on pilgrimage to various sacred sites in India, Tony was able to dwell deeply upon the ancient Vedic and Jain philosophies and work profoundly with the essence of these teachings.

Now people from all over the world visit Tony Samara to take spiritual guidance and experience being in his presence.

Tony Samara believes that “the vast majority of people go through life without directly experiencing the depths of their true self, or understanding their connection to life, or their relationship to others and to the world at large. We are often taught to only relate to the world through our senses. We think, we reason, we feel – but we do not know from our hearts what it means to be connected to what is beyond the senses.”

He recognizes that direct experiences have the potential to radically transform an individual and his or her life, as well as promote a profound and effortless letting go of past emotional, mental and physical pain and suffering.

His main countries of activity are in Europe, yet with the assistance of the Internet he is attracting a Global audience through frequent online interviews and live satsangs. His function is as a Spiritual Master who encourages all to lead their lives actively in a noble way in order to realize the evolution of human consciousness.

Verbal dialogue is not the essence of his teachings, but he explains in a direct and simple way that everyone can understand how each individual can practically integrate greater acceptance, peace and joy into their daily lives.

Tony Samara teaches with humour, humility and with infinite patience, empowering the individual with courage, trust and inner strength to continue on this journey back into wholeness, a path that leads towards real freedom.

“Conscious evolution is ultimate freedom. Overcoming the fear of what lies ahead, by illuminating the spiritual dimension within our nature, is awakening to the splendour of our hearts.

It is said that the mind clarifies matters and reveals truth, but, in fact, it creates confusion for the heart. True reality dwells in its natural center — the heart: the heart is the path to self-realization.

The totally natural state of joy and wisdom experienced as the heart opens to the truth, is the remarkable state of being, free for all to experience.”

Tony Samara is a mirror of what is possible, a shining reminder of the continuous possibility of being human. More information available at: http://www.TonySamara.com

Enjoy the Interview Below:

 

Can Vitamin C prevent Cataracts?

Wednesday, March 30th, 2016

logo1267406_mdA new study published in the journal Ophthalmology concluded that higher dietary intake of vitamin C has been found to potentially have a preventive effect on cataract progression in the first study of twins that looked at the influence of genetic and environmental factors on cataracts over time.

Three hundred twenty four pairs of female twins were followed over ten years by examining photographs of the subjects lenses that allowed researchers to analyze the level of opacity of the lens in detail. Their intake of vitamin C was also measured by means of a food questionnaire. Results showed that a higher intake of vitamin C was associated with a 33 per cent risk reduction of cataract progression and had “clearer” lenses after the 10 year s than those who consumed less vitamin C as part of their diet.   Researchers also found that environmental factors influenced cataracts more than genetic factors. Vitamin C is found in the fluid in the eye that bathes the lens and helps stop the lens from oxidizing and protects them from becoming cloudy. It is believed that the increased dietary vitamin C protects the eye by increasing the vitamin c in the fluid. Researchers said “The findings of this study could have significant impact, particularly for the ageing population globally by suggesting that simple dietary changes such as increased intake of fruit and vegetables as part of a healthier diet could help protect them from cataracts.”…”While we cannot avoid getting older, diabetes and smoking are also risk factors for this type of cataract, and so a healthy balanced diet and lifestyle generally should reduce the risk of needing a cataract operation.”Researchers also said “The human body cannot manufacture vitamin , so we depend on vitamins in the food we eat. We did not find a significant reduction risk in people who took vitamin tablets, so it seems that a healthy diet is better than supplements.” Researchers pointed out some of the limitations of the study.

Link for food glycemic index and lung cancer?

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

 

logo1267406_mdA new study in Cancer Epidemiology: Biomarkers and Prevention concluded that eating a diet with a high glycemic index was independently associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in a non-Hispanic white population. This was the largest study to investigate the potential link between glycemic index and lung cancer and also found the glycemic index was significantly associated with lung cancer risk in particular subgroups, such as never-smoked, those diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) subtype of lung cancer. Diet and lung cancer have been associated in the past and diets high in fruit and vegetables may decrease the risk whereas increased consumption of red meat, saturated fats and dairy products have shown increased lung cancer.

In the study 1,905 newly diagnosed patients with lung cancer and 2,413 healthy individuals were studied. Each self-reported past dietary habits and health histories and the flycemic index and glycemic load were determined using published glycemic index values, subjects. In addition,  were then divided into 5 equal groups based upon the glycemic index and glycemic load values.  Researchers found a 49 percent increased risk of lung cancer among subjects with the highest daily glycemic index compared to those with the lowest. In addition, the associations were greater among subjects who had never smoked, diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma, or had less than 12 years of education.Researchers found that those who never smoked in the highest glycemic index group were more than twice as likely to develop lung cancer as those in the lowest group whereas among smokers the risk was only elevated by 31 percent between the high and low glycemic groups. Those in the high glycemic group were 92 percent more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma than those in the low group.  Among those with fewer years of education than 12 years subjects in the highest glycemic index group were 77 percent more likely to develop lung cancer than those in the low glycemic group compared to 13 percent in subjects with more than 12 years education. .Researchers thought this might relate to poor diet and smoking.

Likewise, glycemic index had no significant association with lung cancer suggesting “it is the average quality, instead of quantity, of carbohydrates consumed that may modulate lung cancer risks.” Researchers pointed out the limitations of the study and made suggestions for further research.

Can Individuals Control Inflammation in the Body and Reduce Chronic Illnesses?

Friday, August 14th, 2015

Logos 005In a new study published in the British Journal of Nutrition by a coalition of experts concluded that unresolved inflammation response is likely to be involved from the early stages of disease and controlling it is crucial to human health. They also say nutrition can influence inflammatory processes and help reduce chronic disease risk. Researchers recognize inflammation is a normal process of host defense but that chronic inflammation can lead to a range of chronic illnesses. Thus, prevention or control of low-grade inflammation can be a target of healthy food or food ingredients. The research team looked at new approaches to deal with inflammation in the body and to help quantify how much diet can positively modulate inflammation.

Some of their conclusions follow: 1) individuals with  a deficiency or excess of certain micronutrients such as folate, vitamin B12, vitamin B6, vitamin E, Vitamin B1 and/or zinc  may lead to an ineffective or excessive inflammatory response, 2) high consumption of fat or glucose may cause post-prandial inflammation following meals and may lead to diabetes and cardiovascular disease, and 3) the western style diet high in fat and simple sugars and often poor in specific micro nutrients has been linked to the increase prevalence of diseases that have a strong immunological and autoimmune component, including allergies, food allergies, atopic dermatitis, and obesity.

Does Yo Yo Dieting Increase your Risk of Cancer?

Wednesday, August 5th, 2015

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The largest study to date reported in early the online American Journal of Epidemiology concluded that weight cycling, repeated cycles of intentional weight loss followed by regain, was not associated with overall risk of cancer in men and women after adjusting for body mass index and other factors. Previous studies in animals and humans have reported that weight cycling may lead to biological processes such as increased T-cell accumulation, enhanced inflammatory responses in adipose tissue, and lowered natural killer cell cytotoxicity that could lead to cancer. However, many of these studies have not been confirmed by follow up studies and at least 2 previous studies showed no association between weight cycling and cancer.

This study examined weight cycling and cancer among more than 132,999 men and women in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutritional Cohort  of the American Cancer Society. Data collection began in 1992/1993 on men and women age 50 to 74 to explore the effect of nutrition on cancer incidence and mortality. Weight cycling and the incidence of all cancers and 15 individual cancers were studied. Over 25,000 subjects developed cancer during the 17 years of the study. Researchers said “This study, to our knowledge the largest and most comprehensive to date on the issue, should be reassuring. Our findings suggest that overweight and obese individuals shouldn’t let fears about ability to maintain weight loss keep them from trying to lose weight in the first place.”

Interviews with Dr Katie Rickel (weight loss) and Dr Laura Dabney (relationship problems) now Available.

Sunday, March 1st, 2015

Dr Katie Rickel

My first guest, Dr Katie Rickel, is a licensed clinical psychologist  who works at Structure House–a residential weight loss facility in North Carolina. She has presented at several conferences  and been featured on radio and television shows including Dr Oz. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.structurehouse.com

 

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My second guest, Dr Laura Dabney, is a physician who works with   professional men having relationship problems, has been interviewed on local and national radio and has an upcoming book on the unique difficultieas of professional men in long term relationships. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.drldabney.com

Enjoy the Interview below:

 

 

Dr Rich Snyder (adrenal fatigue) and Marni Wasserman (plant based diet) Guests This Week.

Sunday, November 23rd, 2014

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My first guest this week was Dr Rich Snyder who is an osteopathic physician board certified in internal medicine and nephrology and specializes in kidney disease, high blood pressure, adrenal health, and medicaL education. He is Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Temple U and has written 5 books including Adrenal Fatigue for Dummies, and What You Need to Know about Kidney Disease.  More information was presented earlier on this site.

 

marni wasserman

 

My second guest was Marni Wasserman, a holistic nutritionist who founded the Marni Wasserman Food Studio and Lifestyle Shop in Toronto, Canada. She has appeared on several radio and television programs and is the author of Plant Based Diet for Dummies. More information was presented earler on this site and can be found at:   http://www.marniwasserman.com

Enjoy the interview below:

 

Will Healthy Behaviors Reduce the Risk of Bowel Cancer?

Wednesday, October 22nd, 2014

New research published in open access journal BMC Medicine  concluded that adopting a combination of 5 healthy behaviors is associated with a reduction in bowel cancer. Quantifying the impact of combining multiple lifestyle behaviors on the risk of developing bowel cancer they found the impact stronger in men than women. Previous research has found a link beween life style and colon cancer but have focused on single characteristics such as eating red meat. This study focused on multiple characteristics.

Data were analyzed from 347,237 men and women from 10 countriesin Europe as part of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Over 12 years there were 3,759 cases of bowel cancer. The healthy lifestyle index included a) a healthy weight, b) low abdominal fat, c) participating in regular exercise, d) not smoking and limiting alcohol, and e) a diet high in fruits, vegetables, fish, yogurt, nuts and seeds, and foods rich in fiber, and a low amount of red and processed meat, A scoring system was developed around these behaviors and a cumulative score was developed for each individual in the study. They found that the more healthy life style factors the cohort adopted, the lower their risk of bowel cancer , Compared to those who had one healthy lifestyle pattern, those with two, three, four or all five behaviors had a 13%, 21%, 34%, and 37% lower rate of developing bowel cancer respectively. Noting a difference between men and women they concluded that up to 22% of the cases in men and 11% of the cases in women would have been prevented if all five lifestyle behaviors had been followed.

Dr Pamela Blair (holistic psychotherapist), Jenny Giblin (yoga and nutrition) and Dan Baker (alternative cooking and baking) Rescheduled for the Next Show.

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

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Pamela Blair, PhD, is a holistic psychotherapist, spiritual counselor, and personal coach with a private practice. She has written for numerous magazines, appeared on radio and television talk shows, and co-authored a bestselling book on grief entitled I Wasn’t Ready to Say Goodbye.  She is also the author of The Next Fifty Years:A guide for women at midlife and beyond., . Her latest book is Getting Older Better  She lives in Shelburne, VT. Visit her online at www.pamblair.com.

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Jenny Giblin is a 29 year old Therapist, Yoga Instructor, & certified Nutrition Counselor.  She has been featured internationally as a health, wellness and beauty expert.  She has a Master’s Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy from Syracuse University in Upstate New York.  Along the way she become a certified yoga-instructor (through Amazing Yoga in Costa Rica, RYT Approved) & became a Certified Nutrition Coach.

Jenny created the term “Therapize”–blending therapy  with nutrition, yoga, exercise, and life styling to help others become the best version of themselves and to live the life of their dreams. Jenny currently coaches clients privately and leads yoga, health & wellness workshops around the world. More information is available at: http://www.jennygiblin.com

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Dan Baker known as Baker Dan specializes in alternative cooking and baking.  In 2006 he formed Baker Dan, LLC.  Hi book, Beating Arthritis: Alternative Cooking was published in 2013. He lives with his family in Manhattan and Warrensburg, NY. More information is available at: http://www.bakerdan.com

 

 

Is a Hi-Fat High-Fructose Diet Worse for the Body than a High Fat Diet Alone?

Friday, July 4th, 2014

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A new study published in Experimental Physiology concluded that a high-fructose, high fat diet can cause harmful effects to the livers of adult rats. Thus, the short term consumption of a Western diet that is rich in saturated fats and fructose, is more damaging to healthy livers that eating a high fat diet alone.  In the study using an  adult rat model resembling adult sedentary humans, ,rats were fed over a two week period  either a low-fat diet, a high fat diet or a diet rich in fat and fructose. The later diet is similar in composition to the diet consumed by the lkarge majority of the Western population. After the two week period, researchers evaluated liver function and found that the presence of fructose in the high-fat diet exacerbated the impairment of this important organ by increasing the build-up of fat in the liver, and decreasing liver insulin sensitivity. Researchers concluded “Much more research should be undertaken in the future, especially regarding the impact of the high-fat high-fructose diet on other metabolically important organs, in order to establish the real impact of this unhealthy dietary habit on health and well-being. “