Posts Tagged ‘obesity’

One alcohol drink daily raises breast cancer risk!

Wednesday, May 31st, 2017

One alcohol drink a day (small glass wine or beer-10 gms alcohol) increases pre-menopausal breast cancer risk by 5 percent and post-menopausal breast cancer risk by 9 percent according to new research reported by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund. Researchers also found that vigorous exercise such as running or fast bicycling decreases the risk of both pre and post-menopausal breast cancer ,They also confirmed earlier findings that moderate exercises decrease the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer that is the most comm,on type of breast cancer. Researchers said “With this comprehensive and up to date report  the evidence is clear, Having as physically active lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight throughout life and limiting alcohol–these are all steps women can take to lower their risk.”

This report analyzed 119 studies, including data on 12 million women and 260,000 cases of breast cancer. The study found the equivalent of 10 gm of alcohol a day increased the risk and the standard drink is 14 gm of alcohol. specifics of exercise and cancer risk found follow: pre-menopausal women who were the most active had a 17 percent lower risk and post-menopausal women had a 10 percent lower risk of developing breast cancer compared to those who were the least active. Moderate activity such as walking and gardening gave a 13 percent lower risk when compared to the most vs least active women for developing cancer.

Other findings included: being overweight or obese increases the risk of post-menopausal breast cancer; women who breast fed were are lower risk of breast cancer; and the great adult weight gain  the greater the post-menopausal breast cancer risk.  There was limited evidence for the following findings that must be repeated, 1) non-starchy vegetables lower the risk for estrogen-receptor (ER) negative breast cancer that is a less common but a more challenging type to treat. ) 2) dairy, diets high in calcium and foods containing carotenoids seemed to lower risk of breast cancer. Carrots, apricots, spinach and kale are all foods high in carotenoids and should be studied for their health value;

Inflammation-Dr David Seaman and Cellular Expansion-Patti McNulty

Sunday, February 12th, 2017

DrDSeaman

My next show on Saturday at 12 noon PST will include the following guests.

Dr. David Seaman was the first person to author a scientific paper that specifically hypothesized that diets can be pro-inflammatory or anti-inflammatory. Since that paper was published in 2002, thousands of papers and numerous books have been published on the topic of diet and inflammation, which is now accepted as mainstream.

Dr. Seaman is a Professor of Clinical Sciences in the Chiropractic Medicine program at National University of Health Sciences in Pinellas Park, Fl. He has a BS from Rutgers University in 1982; a Doctor of Chiropractic from New York Chiropractic College in 1986; and a MS in Bio/nutrition from the University of Bridgeport in 1991

While in clinical practice in the late 1980’s, he became aware of the developing research that linked nutrition to the inflammatory process and noticed that appropriate dietary changes could significantly improve various musculoskeletal and visceral conditions. Based on this experience, he began to focus on nutritional approaches for inflammation/pain control and has followed the related scientific literature ever since. This led to the publication of the first book on nutrition for pain and inflammation, which was followed by many articles and book chapters devoted to this topic. His educational efforts resulted in being awarded the 2006 Academician of the Year by the American Chiropractic Association.

P McNulty

Patti McNulty began her education with four years of intensive training in a combined mental health/addictions and family counseling program. Subsequently, she spent twelve years providing both inpatient and outpatient addiction services to a range of psychiatric hospitals. She was then the primary Employee Assistance Program counselor for JFK and LaGuardia Airports in New York, where employees could receive counseling and addictions treatment on-site.

In 1996, she was awarded a New York State citation for her work with the survivors and employees involved in the Flight 800 plane crash that same year. Her work experience pulled her in the direction of not only further addictions treatment work, but also in trauma work in addicted populations.

In 2005, she became a holistic studies practitioner, completed two graduate programs at the School of Vanati in Pittsburgh, and is presently involved in the extension graduate program.

Patti started working at Serenity Acres Treatment Center in January of 2013, as a licensed Certified Associate Counselor for Alcohol and Drugs (CAC-AD), and provides addictions counseling, family education, and holistic therapy services to her clients. She also runs her own business, Healing Branches, in Severna Park, Md. At Healing Branches, Patti practices Cellular Expansion and Healing Energy Medicine—a form of hands on bodywork that heals through the cells for optimal health and wellness.

Enjoy the interview below:

 

 

Does Obesity Increase the Risk of Breast Cancer among Post Menopausal Women?

Wednesday, June 17th, 2015

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A recent analysis in an article in  online  JAMA Oncology suggested that postmenopausal women who were overweight and obese had an increased risk of invasive breast cancer compared to women of normal weight. Results were based upon data from 67,142 postmenopausal women between 1993 and 1998 with a median age of 13 years of follow-up. There were 3,388 invasive breast cancers.

Results showed 1) women who were overweight or obese as measured by the body mass index had an increased risk of invasive breast cancer compared to women of normal weight measured by the body mass index; 2) the risk was greatest for women with a body mass index (BMI) greater than 35 who had a increased risk of 58 percent when compared with women of normal weight (BMI under 25); 3) a BMI of 35 or higher was associated with an increased risk of estrogen and progesteron receptor-positive breast cancer but not estrogen receptor-negative cancers; 4) obesity was associated with markers of poor prognosis: women with a BMI greater than 35 were more likely to have large tumors, evidence of lymph none involvement and poorly  differentiated tumors; 5) women with a baseline BMI under 25 gaining more than 5 percent body weight during the follow-up period had an increased risk of breast cancer; 6) among overweight or obese women who changed weight (gain or lose) there was no increased risk of breast cancer during follow up; and 7)post-menopausal hormone therapy had no effect on the BMI-breast cancer relationship.  Researchers further said “Obesity is associated with a dose-response increased postmenopausal breast cancer risk, particularly for estrogen receptor-and progesterone receptor-positive disease, but risk does not vary by hormone therapy use ot race/ethnicity.” More research is needed according to the researchers.

Interviews with Dr Katie Rickel (weight loss) and Dr Laura Dabney (relationship problems) now Available.

Sunday, March 1st, 2015

Dr Katie Rickel

My first guest, Dr Katie Rickel, is a licensed clinical psychologist  who works at Structure House–a residential weight loss facility in North Carolina. She has presented at several conferences  and been featured on radio and television shows including Dr Oz. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.structurehouse.com

 

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My second guest, Dr Laura Dabney, is a physician who works with   professional men having relationship problems, has been interviewed on local and national radio and has an upcoming book on the unique difficultieas of professional men in long term relationships. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found at: http://www.drldabney.com

Enjoy the Interview below:

 

 

Are There More Deaths from Lack of Exercise or from Obesity?

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

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A new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition concluded that twice as many deaths may be attributed to the lack of physical activity compared with the number of deaths attributed to obesity and a brisk 20 minute walk daily could reduce an individual’s risk of early death. . Physical inactivity has  consistently been associated with a great risk of heart disease, cancer and early death.,

In the sample of over 334,000 European men and women followed over twelve years researchers measured height, weight, and waist circumference, and used self-assessment to measure levels of physical activity. Findings showed that the greatest reduction in risk of premature death occurred in the comparison between inactive and moderately inactive groups based upon combining activities at work with recreational activities. Just under a quarter  (22.7%)of subjects were inactive based upon reporting of no recreational activity combined with a sedentary occupation. Researchers estimated that doing exercise equivalent to a 20 minute brisk walk daily would move an individual from the inactive to moderately inactive group and reduce their risk of premature death by between 16 and 30 percent. This was greatest among normal weight subjects but even those with a higher BMI saw benefits.

Using the most recent available death rates in Europe they estimated 337,000 of the 9.2 million deaths among Europeans were attributed to obesity (classed as a BMI greater than 30) but double this number of deaths (676,000) could be attributed to physical inactivity. Researchers said the message is that just a small amount of physical activity daily could have substantial health benefits.

Can Coffee Help Prevent Obesity?

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

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A new study published in Pharmecutical Research concluded that a chemical commonly found in coffee may help prevent some of the damaging effects of obesity. Specifically, chlorogenic acid (CGA) found in coffee significantly reduces insulin resistance and accumulation of fat in the livers of mice who were fed a high fat diet. This compound that is found in great abundance in coffee is also found in fruits and vegetables like apples, pears, tomatoes and blueberries.

Two side effects of obesity in addition to weight geinare increased insulin resistance and the accumulation of fat in the liver that can lead to diabetes and poor liver function.  To test the effects of CGA a group of mice were fed a high fat iet for 15 wqeeks and were also injected with a CGA solution twice weekly. Findings showed that the CGA not only effectively prevented weight gaij, but also helped maintaihn normal blood pressure and healthy liver composition. The researchers said “CGA is a powerful antioxidant that reducesinflammation….A lot of evidence suggests that obesity-related diseases are caused by chronic inflammation. so if we can control that, we can hopefully ofset some of the negative effects of excessive weight gain.”

Can NSAIDs Lower Breast Cancer Recurrence in Overweight, Obese Women

Wednesday, August 20th, 2014

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A new study published in Cancer Research concluded that the recurrence of hormone related breast cancer was cut in half in overweight and obese women who regularly used aspirin or other non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s). authors said “Our study suggests that limiting inflammatory signaling may be effective, less toxic approach to altering the cancer promiting effects of obesity and improving patient response to hormonal therapy.”  In their study researchers fround that women  whose body mass index was greater than 30 and had estrogen receptor alpha (ERa) -positive breast cancer had a 52 percent lower rate of occurrence and a 28-month delay in time of recurrence if they were taking aspirin or other NSAID’s. Using blood from obese patients, researchers carried out laboratory experiments to recreate atumor environment containing cancer cells, fat cells, and the immune cells that promote inflammation. They found that factors associated with obesity initiate a network of signaling within the tumor environment to promote growth and resistance to therapy. They concluded “These studies show that the greatest benefit from aspirin and other NSAID’s will be in those with a disease driven by inflammation , and not just obesity.”

Datwa was used from 440 women diagnosed with invasive ERa-positive breast cancer and treatedbetween 1987 and 2011. Of the group studies 48.5 percent were obese and 25,8 percent were overweight. About 81 percent took aspirin, and the rest took another NSAID.  About 42 percent and 25 percent took statins and omega-3 fatty acid respectively. After controlling for statin and omega-3 fatty acids that have anti-inflammatory effects, there was still an indication of protection from aspirin and other NSAID’s.

Interview with Dr Michael A. Smith Now Available

Sunday, March 2nd, 2014

CWP2013__smith_13Yesterday I interviewed Dr Michael A. Smith, Senior Health Scientist and Health and Wellness media Personality for Life Extension. In the interview he talks about the latest information on Disease Prevention and Treatment that you wont want to miss. His book on the Dietary Supplement Pyramid was published this month. More information was presented earlier on this site and can be found  at:                            https://www.lef.org/PressPass/Michael-A-Smith-MD_01.htm 

Enjoy the interview below:

 

 

Can Lifestyle Factors Reduce the Risk of Esophageal Cancer?

Friday, April 12th, 2013

logo1267406_mdRecent news from the Seattle Barrett’s Esophagus Program  at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in collaboration with Brigham & Women’s College and the University of California in San Francisco have shown that a systematic approach to early  cancer detection can boost five-year survival rates from about 15 percent to more than 80 percent. They  have also shown that modifiable lifestyle factors-from reducing obesity to quitting smoking–may also prevent progression of Barrett’s esophagus to esophageal cancer. Some of the ways to prevent this condition from progressing to esophageal cancer were identified and follow.

Earlier research in 2007 reported that people with the more aggressive form of Barrett’s may benefit gfrom preventive therapy with aspirin or other non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Following Barrett’s patients over time they identified a cluster of 4 known cancer bio markers  in this group that increased their risk of developing esophageal cancer. They found that subjects with 3 or more of these bio markers who also used aspirin or other no0nsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s)  had a 30 % chance of developing esophageal cancer after 10 years whereas those who did not use the aspirin had a 79% change of developing cancer with a decade. They believe aspirin and other non-steroidal inflammatory drugs may fight cancer by reducing chronic  inflammation. However, because this was a long term observational study and not a clinical trial they cannot recommend aspirin for people with Barrett’s and also advise that anyone wh uses them do so under medical direction because of the side effects such as g.i. bleeding.

Another study looked at Barrett’s and statin drugs for lowering cholesterol and found that various combinations of statin and/or NSAID’s used by patients with Barrett’s and and high grade dysplasia had a reduced risk of esophageal cancer when compared with those who did not use these drugs.

This year they lo0ked at lifestyle and esophageal cancer and found that heavy smokers with Barrett’s were more than twice as likely to develop esophageal cancer than non-smokers with Barrett’s. They also found that obesity especially belly fat, was more strongly associated with the progression of Barrett’s to esophageal cancer.

They also offered suggestions for managing the symptoms of chronic acid reflux that is a risk factor for Barrett’s. These included smoking cessation, keeping weight down, getting regular exercise, eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, refrain from eating four hours before retiring, elevate the head of your bed if you have heart burn, and take antacids for occasional heartburn and see you doctor if you have frequent heartburn or if over the counter medications do not help.

Does Childhood Obesity Increase the Risk of Adult Cancer?

Friday, August 3rd, 2012

New research published in the journal of Cancer Epidemiology. Biomarkers and Prevention and Obesity concluded that obesity in adolescents has a direct link to the incidence of urothelial (bladder and urinary tract) and colorectal cancers in adulthood when obesity is defined as a Body Mass Index (BMI) in the 85th percentile and above. This group of adolescent has a 1.42% greater chance (50% higher risk) of developing urothelial or colorectal cancer in adulthood than those beneath it.

Researchers conducted a longitudinal study of 1.1 million males in the Israel Defense Force using health information collected by the army for a follow-up period of 18 years. When controlled for factors such as year of birth and education, the researchers discovered a clear link between childhood BMI and those diagnosed with urothelial or colorectal cancer later in life. Although at this time the researchers have only found a link between childhood  BMI and these types of cancer later in life they believe further research may find a wider range of cancers including pancreatic cancer which they are currently researching. Further research will evaluate whether or not obesity is a direct risk factor for cancer or a confounding factor for a genetic variation and whether or not a successful weight loss program can reduce a child’s risk of developing urothelial and colorectal cancer in adulthood.