Posts Tagged ‘prevention’

Dementia: Are Some Cases Preventable.

Wednesday, July 26th, 2017

Recent research published in Lancet and reported by the first Lancet Commission on Dementia Prevention and Care stated that managing lifestyle factors such as hearing loss, smoking, hypertension, and depression could prevent one-third of the world’s dementia cases. They also said nonpharmacological interventions such as social contact and exercise for people with dementia are beneficial. Researchers said “There’s been a great deal of focus on developing medicines to prevent dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.” ” But we can’t lose sight of the real major advances we’ve already made in treating dementia, including preventive approaches.”

Twenty four international experts were brought together to systematically review existing research and provide evidence=based recommendations for treating and preventing dementia. Nine risk factors were identified in early, mid and late life that increase the likelihood of developing dementia. They said by increasing education in early life and addressing hearing loss, hypertension, and obesity dementia could be reduced by up to 20 percent. In late life stopping smoking, treating depression, increasing physical activity, increasing social activities, and managing diabetes could reduce dementia by another 15 percent. Evaluating medications they said “Antipsychotic drugs are commonly used to treat agitation and aggression. but there are substantial concern about these drugs because of an increased risk of death, cardiovascular adverse events and infections, not to mention excessive sedation.”

Dr Frederic Luskin (Forgiveness) and Tara/Steve Mann (Cancer Foundation).

Sunday, February 28th, 2016

Luskin Fredfred luskin bookFrederic Luskin, PhD, is director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Project, Director of wellness education at Stanford University, and professor of clinical psychology at Sofia University. He is author of Stress Free for Good, Forgive for Good, and Forgive for Love.

Luskin is renowned for teaching about the psychological and medical benefits of forgiveness. Research done by Luskin and others has confirmed that forgiveness can reduce anger, depression, and stress while it leads to greater feelings of optimism, hope, compassion, and self-confidence.

As director of the Stanford University Forgiveness Project, Luskin conducts an ongoing series of workshops and research projects that investigate the effectiveness of his forgiveness methods on a variety of populations. The forgiveness project has explored forgiveness therapy with people who suffered from the violence in Northern Ireland and Sierra Leone, as well as from the attacks on the World Trade Center September 11, 2001. In addition, his work has been successfully applied and researched in corporate, medical, legal, and religious settings.

Luskin’s work has been featured in Time; O, The Oprah Magazine; Ladies’ Home Journal; US News & World Report; Parade; Prevention; the New York Times; the Los Angeles Times; the Chicago Tribune; USA Today; and the Wall Street Journal.

Luskin is also a professor at the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology.

He offers lectures, workshops, seminars, and training nationwide on forgiveness, stress management, and emotional competence.  More information at: http://thepowerofforgiveness.com

taramannMy second guests, Tara and Steve Mann, are Co-Founders, CEO and President of Cancer Crackdown. Cancer Crackdown is a 501(c)(3) Non-Profit organization, their passion is to help fighters take their battle with cancer to the next level. They are unique in that they fight alongside those battling this disease. They develop plans and help fighters and survivors to be successful in following them to reach their overall health goals. They offer a wide range of resources and encouragement for those fighting, those surviving and those that wish to prevent this disease. We all have a choice in this battle against cancer, to survive or to prevent!!
Their mission is to be the trusted source of knowledge regarding natural therapies to defeat cancer and remain cancer free. We partner with fighters and survivors by supporting and navigating them through their battle. Together, they develop a unique plan that is specific to each individual and instills in them a fearless approach to winning the battle.
Cancer Crackdown started as a small group on Facebook in January 2012 with a few people who wanted to share some information on tips and best practices during chemo. Cancer Crackdown has grown and we are now serving cancer fighters all over the world!!
Cancer fighters that can no longer take chemo or choose not to are in dire need of accurate information and guidance. Due to the vast amount of information available and many untrustworthy sources on the internet, it makes it difficult for us to make decisions about what is viable information and thus dissuades many from knowing what is worth trying. We have and will continue to research topics of interest and ensure credibility of sources. We help put patients in contact with proper practitioners in their area and locate services for them that may benefit their treatment. We are in the process of building on the services we are able to provide to cancer patients that we are so fortunate to partner with during their difficult time. More information available at: http://www.cancercrackdown.org

Enjoy the Interview below:

 

Can the Risk of Colorectal Cancer Among Obese People be Reduced?

Friday, January 22nd, 2016

logo1267406_mdA new study published in Cancer Research concluded that they have discovered the biological previously unfound connection of a long known association between obesity and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. They have also identified an approved drug that might prevent  the cancer in obese people.

In research they found that a high caloric diet turned off expression of a key hormone in the intestines, which lead to deactivation of a tumor suppressor pathway. Genetic replacement of that hormone turned the tumor suppressor back on and prevented cancer development even when mice continued to eat excess calories. The drug that was used was linaclotide (Linzess) that is structurally related to the hormone and may be a therapeutic approach to prevent colorectal cancer in obese patients. The researchers said “Our study suggests that colorectal cancer can be prevented in obese individuals with the use of hormone replacement therapy.”

In the study they used genetically engineered mice on different diets and found that obesity (either from excess fat or carbohydrate consumption. or both, is associated with loss of the hormone guanylin, that is produced in the intestine’s epithelium or cells lining the intestines. The hormones turn on its receptor guarylyl  cyclase (GUCY2C) that regulates processes underlying regeneration of the intestinal epithelium. “The lining of the intestines is very dynamic and continuously being replaced, and the GUCY2C contributes to the choreography of the key processes  needed for thus regeneration.”  Deactivation of the guanylin gene is common in colorectal cancers in both humans and animals and morbidly ovese patients echibit an 80% decrease in Guanylin gene expression compared to lean people.

In this study they found the consequence of that loss is that , and without the hormone, the receptor is silent. the guanylin  hormone receptor acts as a growth-controlling tumor suppressor happening early in the cancer development. “When the receptor is silenced, the epithelium becomes dysfunctional, setting up the conditions for cancer development.” The research demonstrates that obese mice, compared to lean mice, were much more likely to silence the hormone and its receptor, “We believe that if colorectal cancer is going to develop, it will be through this silencing mechanism-and that it will happen much more frequently in the obese.” This study demonstrates that if you can prevent hormone loss, you can also prevent tumor development and  a drug like guanylin, can activate GUCY2C tumor-suppressing receptors to prevent cancer in these patients.

Researchers have already started multi site clinical studies testing dose and side effects of linaclotide use in healthy volunteers.

 

Lise Alschuler, Naturopathic Physician, Discusses Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

Sunday, December 20th, 2015

LiseHeadshotStripedShirtLise Alschuler is a naturopathic doctor with board certification in naturopathic oncology and has been practicing since 1994. She graduated from Brown University with an undergraduate degree in Medical Anthropology and received a doctoral degree in naturopathic medicine from Bastyr University. Dr. Alschuler is past-President of the American Association of Naturopathic Physicians and a founding board member and current President of the Oncology Association of Naturopathic Physicians. She also currently serves as President Emeritus on the board of the Naturopathic Post-Graduate Association. Dr. Alschuler works as an independent consultant in the area of practitioner and consumer health education. She is the Executive Director of TAP integration, a nonprofit educational resource for integrative practitioners. She maintains a naturopathic oncology practice out of Naturopathic Specialists , based in Scottsdale AZ. Previously, she was the department head of naturopathic medicine at Midwestern Regional Medical Center – Cancer Treatment Centers of America. She was also the clinic medical director and botanical medicine chair at Bastyr, as well she was on the faculty of Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine. The American Association of Naturopathic Physicians recognized Dr. Alschuler in 2014 as Physician of the Year. She also received an honorary degree from the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine and the Joseph Pizzorno Founders award from Bastyr University in the same year.

Dr. Alschuler is the co-author of The Definitive Guide to Cancer and The Definitive Guide to Thriving After Cancer. She co-created http://www.FiveToThrivePlan.com, and co-hosts a radio show, Five To Thrive Live! on the Cancer Support Network about living more healthfully in the face of cancer. She calls Tucson AZ and Chicago, IL home. Learn more at http://www.drlise.net.

Dr Rich Snyder (Kidney Disease) and Dr Larry Hoberman (probiotics) Interviewed.

Sunday, October 25th, 2015

Snyder-RichardMy first guest, Dr Rich Snyder is an osteopathic physician board certified in Internal Medicine and Nephrology (the study of kidney disease). His areas of specialization include kidney disease, high blood pressure, adrenal health and medical education. He is Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Temple University School of Medicine and Clinical Professor of Medicine at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine. He is the author of five books including Adrenal Fatigue For Dummies and What You Must Know About Kidney Disease: A Practical Guide For Using Conventional and Complementary Treatments. He is also the author of What You Need to Know About Dialysis: The Secret to Surviving and Thriving on Dialysis and is also the High Blood Pressure Expert on About.com

L HobermanMy second guest, Board Certified Gastroenterologist Lawrence Hoberman, MD, is the creator of EndoMune Advanced Probiotic and founder of Medical Care Innovations. He has spent more than 40 years practicing medicine and is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Gastroenterology. Frustrated by the lack of options to treat his patients suffering from Irritable Bowel Disease (IBD) in the early 2000s, Dr. Hoberman met with a PhD microbiologist to identify a combination of bacteria that might work to destroy the harmful bacteria living in the intestines, improving and maintaining the health of adults. The result is the development of his own effective probiotic supplement: EndoMune Advanced Probiotic.
Dr. Hoberman currently sees patients as a part of a health and wellness practice that stresses preventative medicine. He is in practice at Health by Design, located in San Antonio, Texas. He is available for speaking engagements about digestive health and the benefits of probiotics and has spoken at several conferences. More information is available at: http://www.endomune.com

Listen to the Interview Below:

 

 

 

Can Coffee Help Prevent Obesity?

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

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A new study published in Pharmecutical Research concluded that a chemical commonly found in coffee may help prevent some of the damaging effects of obesity. Specifically, chlorogenic acid (CGA) found in coffee significantly reduces insulin resistance and accumulation of fat in the livers of mice who were fed a high fat diet. This compound that is found in great abundance in coffee is also found in fruits and vegetables like apples, pears, tomatoes and blueberries.

Two side effects of obesity in addition to weight geinare increased insulin resistance and the accumulation of fat in the liver that can lead to diabetes and poor liver function.  To test the effects of CGA a group of mice were fed a high fat iet for 15 wqeeks and were also injected with a CGA solution twice weekly. Findings showed that the CGA not only effectively prevented weight gaij, but also helped maintaihn normal blood pressure and healthy liver composition. The researchers said “CGA is a powerful antioxidant that reducesinflammation….A lot of evidence suggests that obesity-related diseases are caused by chronic inflammation. so if we can control that, we can hopefully ofset some of the negative effects of excessive weight gain.”

Can vitamin A assist in cancer prevention?

Wednesday, April 9th, 2014

logo1267406_mdResearch published recently in the International Journal of Oncology concluded that a derivative of vitamin A known as retinoic acid that is found in carrots and sweet potatoes helps pre-cancer cells revert back to normal cells. The researchers exposed four types of breast cells to different concernatrations of retinoic acid including normal, precancerous, cancerous, and fully aggressive cancer cells. They noted that precancer cells began to look like normal cells in shape but also changed their genetic signatyure back to normal. There were 443 genes in the precancer cells that were either up or down regulated on their way to becoming cancerous and that changed back to normal. The researcher said “we were able to see this effect of retinoic acid because we were looking at four distinct stages of breast cancer. However, the cells that were fully cancerous did not respond to the retinoic acid suggesting that there may be a small window of opportunity for the compound to help in preventing cancer progression. In addition, they found that only one concentration of the retinoic acid (about one micro Molar) produced the anti-cancer effect. They found that lower doses produced no change and higher doses produced a smaller effect. Further research is planned.

NB: IT IS INTERESTING TO ME THAT WHEN I HAD LUNG CANCER 39 YEARS AGO, MY DOCTOR PRESCRIBED HIGH DOSES OF VITAMIN A FOR THE PURPOSE OF PREVENTING NORMAL CELLS CONVERTING TO CANCER CELLS. THIS IS ONE OF THE LAST PRESCRIBED TREATMENTS IN MY REGIME TO BE VALIDATED BY RESEARCH. WHAT A PROGRESSIVE DOCTOR I HAD IN DR TOM ROBERTS FOR WHOM I WILL BE FOREVER GRATEFUL. GOD BLESS YOU DR ROBERTS FOR ALL YOU DID FOR ME AND OTHERS.

Does Silica Pose a Risk of Lung Cancer?

Friday, December 20th, 2013

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A new study published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians a researcher concluded that there are new developments in understanding the effects of silica and they call for action to reduce illnessand death from silica exposure at work including stronger regulations, heightened awareness and prevention and increased attention to early detection of silicosos and lung cancer using low dose CT scanning.

Some developments include publication of studies providing detailed exposure response data, enabling regulations based upon quantitative risk assessment and also studies that show those exposed to silica who do not have silicosis and who do not smoke still have increased rates of death from lung mortality.In additional low dose computer tomography scanning has proven to be an effective screening method for lung cancer and the author recommends this screening be offered to those exposed beginning at age 50 if they also have a 20 pack years of smoking.

The report says the low level silica exposure on beaches and in ambient air in general, does not seem to cause health effects. Rather it is the concentrated exposure occurring on the job, most often construction materials such as concrete, masonry. tile and rock.

The most effective methods for controlling occupational exposure is banning sandblasting, metal grinds for abrasive blasting, modifying procedures and equipment, and controlling dust transmission by using enclosures, air curtains, water spray, and ventilation techniques, and the use of personal protective equipment., .

Can Coffee Reduce the Risk of Liver Cancer?

Wednesday, October 30th, 2013

logo1267406_mdA new study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology concluded coffee consumption reduces the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the most common type of liver cancer, by about 40 percent. The researchers said “Our research confirmed past claims that coffee is good for your health, and particularly the liver.”

A meta-analysis of articles published between 1996 and 2012 was carried out and 16 high quality studies with a total of 3,153 cases was selected for analysis. There was consistency of results across studies, time periods, and populations but it was difficult to establish whether the association between coffee drinking and HCC found was causal or if the relationship was a result of patients with liver and digestive diseases voluntarily reducing their coffee intake. Researchers said “It remains unclear whether coffee drinking has an additional role in liver cancer prevention.” They continue on to say that the role of coffee consumption would be limited compared to what is available through current measures such as hepatitis B virus vaccination, control of hepatitis C virus transmission and reduction of alcohol drinking that in total an avoid more than 90 percent of primary liver cancers worldwide.

Can Lifestyle Factors Reduce the Risk of Esophageal Cancer?

Friday, April 12th, 2013

logo1267406_mdRecent news from the Seattle Barrett’s Esophagus Program  at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in collaboration with Brigham & Women’s College and the University of California in San Francisco have shown that a systematic approach to early  cancer detection can boost five-year survival rates from about 15 percent to more than 80 percent. They  have also shown that modifiable lifestyle factors-from reducing obesity to quitting smoking–may also prevent progression of Barrett’s esophagus to esophageal cancer. Some of the ways to prevent this condition from progressing to esophageal cancer were identified and follow.

Earlier research in 2007 reported that people with the more aggressive form of Barrett’s may benefit gfrom preventive therapy with aspirin or other non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Following Barrett’s patients over time they identified a cluster of 4 known cancer bio markers  in this group that increased their risk of developing esophageal cancer. They found that subjects with 3 or more of these bio markers who also used aspirin or other no0nsteroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAID’s)  had a 30 % chance of developing esophageal cancer after 10 years whereas those who did not use the aspirin had a 79% change of developing cancer with a decade. They believe aspirin and other non-steroidal inflammatory drugs may fight cancer by reducing chronic  inflammation. However, because this was a long term observational study and not a clinical trial they cannot recommend aspirin for people with Barrett’s and also advise that anyone wh uses them do so under medical direction because of the side effects such as g.i. bleeding.

Another study looked at Barrett’s and statin drugs for lowering cholesterol and found that various combinations of statin and/or NSAID’s used by patients with Barrett’s and and high grade dysplasia had a reduced risk of esophageal cancer when compared with those who did not use these drugs.

This year they lo0ked at lifestyle and esophageal cancer and found that heavy smokers with Barrett’s were more than twice as likely to develop esophageal cancer than non-smokers with Barrett’s. They also found that obesity especially belly fat, was more strongly associated with the progression of Barrett’s to esophageal cancer.

They also offered suggestions for managing the symptoms of chronic acid reflux that is a risk factor for Barrett’s. These included smoking cessation, keeping weight down, getting regular exercise, eating a diet rich in fruit and vegetables, refrain from eating four hours before retiring, elevate the head of your bed if you have heart burn, and take antacids for occasional heartburn and see you doctor if you have frequent heartburn or if over the counter medications do not help.